Patient Education

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer, RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Part 2 in a series discussing nutritional status and diabetic foot ulcer risk.
To read Part 1,Click Here

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Karen Zulkowski's picture

By Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

I have talked about treating wounds, assessing wounds and care planning, but have not discussed the patient as a person. I always talk to the patient and family about options for care, how aggressive they want to be in their treatment plan and explain to them what I am doing and why I am doing it. The importance of this communication process is one of the reasons why I got involved in the Wound App project. I realized rural facilities don’t have wound expertise available and additional testing may mean many miles of travel. The consultation plan calls for patient/family involvement. But the communication with the patient and family is important regardless of how or where you are doing wound care.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

Spring is finally here. I hope that you were able to enjoy SAWC earlier this month, and have been enjoying the May weather. This time of year is one of renewal and promise. This can be a time of year when individuals with wounds find hope and encouragement or fall prey to despair. It is essential as health care providers that we do not become so focused on the wound of our patients that we fail to see the complexities affecting the individual.

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

Ah February! The month of love and romance. Regardless of whether Buckeye Chuck or Punxsutawney Phil predicted an early spring or 6 more weeks of winter for those of us who live in the northern climes winter seems cold, dark and endless. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a real possibility and the idea of hibernating until spring is tempting. If you are living with a chronic wound, this time of year can be especially problematic. Getting out for groceries, doctors appointments, or worship can be a major undertaking. The challenges for home care nurses are incredible.

Lydia Corum's picture

By Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

I recently wrote a blog on my proposal to remodel home health care. I continue my musings as we consider other ways we can incorporate consumer-based business and marketing practices into the health care arena. What has become very clear to me through my recent studies and professional experience is that there is an urgent need to continue with evidence-based care and quality care. One way for this to happen is for health care facilities to become specialized and to fill the unique needs of the community at large and then market that specialty.

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Joy Hooper's picture

By Joy Hooper RN, BSN, CWOCN

The "J-Pouch" is an example of an internal intestinal pouch constructed of small intestine. The surgery is performed as an alternative to a permanent ileostomy when the large intestine (colon) needs to be removed. The J-Pouch procedure can be performed in a I, II, or III stage surgical procedure. Although there are many complications associated with this procedure such as anal leakage after surgery, bowel obstruction, and pouchitis, there are many people that feel the J-Pouch procedure literally gave them their life back. Below is a comment from a J-Pouch patient:

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

The new year has begun. Many of us have made resolutions with the best of intentions. Exercise more, lose weight, eat healthy foods, keep blood sugar in a healthy range, stop smoking and using smokeless tobacco, watch less television. The list goes on and on. I am no stranger to not keeping my New Year's resolutions beyond a month or two. The best way to keep a resolution is to make it realistic. Make your goals achievable. Don't resolve to run a marathon if you cannot walk around the block. Rather than vowing to lose 50 pounds, set a goal of 10. Once you have lost 10 pounds resolve to lose another 10 and so on.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Did you ever notice that 4 or 5 of the ten most popular New Year's resolutions involve food? We either want to eat more or less of certain foods, usually in an effort to lose weight or improve our appearance with exercise and diet. What about your clients who visit your wound care clinic and are struggling to heal chronic wounds? What advice should you give them? Your advice should be practical, achievable and cost-effective for them. Consider these options for your resolutions in guiding your patients in their own:

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Beth Hawkins Bradley's picture

By Beth Hawkins Bradley RN, MN, CWON

We just can’t resist New Year’s resolutions. This is the time of year when we reflect back on aspects of the year that is ending, and determine to do some things differently in the year that is dawning. If you are reading this, then you likely use negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in your clinical practice. If you use this valuable therapy to help your patients’ wounds to heal, then you are aware that NPWT comes with risks. Our friends in the legal profession certainly understand this. Look back at the FDA Safety Alert issued in February 2011 in response to increased injuries among patients receiving NPWT. The FDA concluded that many of the injuries and deaths were related to insufficient observation of wound dressings and lack of patient teaching.