Patient Education

Lydia Corum's picture

by Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

At the start of December, I was looking at graduation from my Master's Degree program and the completion of my final paper. A capstone to the Master's program is much like the dissertation to the doctoral program. My journey has been long and along the way I have increased my base of knowledge. What I have learned on this journey will enhance my practical knowledge of wound care and patient care. I learned that health care must change, and we must look hard at how we are doing business and be willing to challenge the status quo. Health care needs highly knowledgeable leaders to assure patients receive quality care by being good stewards of the money given to promote that care. The provider must be educated to assure the patient's wishes are followed first and always.

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Joy Hooper's picture

By Joy Hooper RN, BSN, CWOCN

A person with a colostomy has several options as to how they choose to manage their ostomy. The choice of which pouch is only the beginning when choosing the route they want to use to manage their stoma output. In this video, I will provide an overview of colostomy irrigation. For more resources on colostomy irrigation, see the UOAA website at www.ostomy.org . Other online groups and forums include “STOMACITY” or “COLONTOWN” on Facebook and www.meetanostomate.com.

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Joy Hooper's picture

By Joy Hooper RN, BSN, CWOCN

The appearance of a new stoma on a patient’s abdomen can be shocking for the patient, family members, caregivers, and even some healthcare professionals. Stomas presented in textbooks, educational literature, and diagrams often appear round and “budded.” Patients will sometimes see images of other stomas and compare it to the appearance of their stoma. If their stoma is flush with the skin on the abdomen or retracted they may feel the surgeon did a poor job. Actually, the patient's body can have just as much to do with the appearance of the stoma as the surgeons surgical technique does.

David Hite's picture

By David Hite PhD

Diabetes, the leading cause of amputation of the lower limbs, places an enormous burden on both the individual and the health care system. It’s estimated that the annual cost for treating diabetic foot problems is over one billion dollars. During their lifetime, 15 percent of people with diabetes will experience a foot ulcer and about 20 percent of those will require amputation.

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA, WCC

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY, PT. 17

It has been said that even a blind squirrel finds a nut once in a while. Like Isaac Newton who discovered gravity courtesy of an apple hitting his noggin and Ben Franklin discovering electricity by flying a key laden kite into a Philadelphia storm, even lowly rambling wound care guys trip over the truth. So many questions and so few answers until…there amongst the trees appears a forest. And so, in the spirit of the Indianapolis Colts finding a diamond in Andrew Luck, I am pleased to announce that I have recently identified the presence of a multi-tribal primitive species existing amongst us. Based on their aberrant business behavior, their ability to masquerade as Homo sapiens, their will-o-the-wisp flashes of humanity (interspersed with maniacal idiocy) and their unquenchable thirst for complexity and deception, I have proudly named them after our current governmental medical overlords.

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Joy Hooper's picture

By Joy Hooper RN, BSN, CWOCN

Welcome to the third vlog in the series "GI Didn't Know That." In this video I will explain two more ostomy procedures: a "Loop Ostomy" and a "Double Barrel Ostomy." Both of these surgeries can be done as a temporary or permanent procedure.

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA, WCC

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY, PT. 16

As I write my blog, I wonder whether anyone really reads it. I know that my wife and daughters do, because they have no choice. For all the foibles my 24 year old is quick to point out --Dad, you’re not really going to wear that; Dad, you have a stain on your shirt; Dad, you need to empty the cat litter (to which I reply, “why, they didn't eat what I poured them yet!”)--, she has commented on an occasion or two, “That was funny” or, “Yeah, it’s pretty good this time.”

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Joy Hooper's picture

By Joy Hooper RN, BSN, CWOCN

There are various types of urinary diversions. One of the most common urinary diversions is the ileal conduit. The ileal conduit actually borrows a segment of bowel to create the stoma, causing the patient to undergo surgery on the GI tract as well as the urinary system. An ileal conduit is an incontinent urinary diversion and will require the use of an external pouch.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

Part 4 in a series discussing the challenges and opportunities in patient/family education
For Part 1, Click Here
For Part 2, Click Here
For Part 3, Click Here