Patient Outcomes

Michel Hermans's picture
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By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

The 2014 SAWC Fall conference took place in October in Las Vegas. As always, it was good to see colleagues, share thoughts and stories, stroll through the exhibition areas and attend the lectures. As usual, the meeting was well organized although given the size of the Vegas hotels, reaching it—even from your room within the conference hotel itself—provided enough walking exercise for a week.

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Ron Sherman's picture

By Ron Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H

My thoughts today do not center on biotherapy or even wound care. They center on the concept of perspective. But perspective really affects every aspect of life, including wound care. The ability (or, better yet, the habit) of adjusting our perspectives allows us to understand the world in ways that would otherwise not make sense. Let me give an example by explaining what prompted me to focus on perspective in the first place: I just witnessed the most amazing dog trick in the world (since it’s Halloween season, I guess we could call this a trick for treats).

Janis Harrison's picture

By Janis E. Harrison, RN, BSN, CWOCN, CFCN

Monday came with expectations of fixing the problem. It wasn't to be. Daryl was weak and hated the NG tube in his nose and throat. I arrived early at his bedside and waited for the doctor to let us know what the plan of action would be for the blockage problem. I left to use the public restroom and missed the doctor's visit. No one quite new what the plan was when I questioned the staff. So I created my own plan. I made Daryl get out of bed and started walking him in the halls throughout the entire hospital. I did not want him to get any weaker and I wanted to see if the mobility would increase the gastrointestinal motility. He was not happy with me at first but with education and the explanation of why, he was more than willing to try.

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Bruce Ruben's picture

By Bruce E. Ruben MD

This particular blog is not necessarily intended to educate, but to be a thinking piece that asks more questions than it answers.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist originally approved by the FDA in the early 1980s for the treatment of heroin addiction. The high dose of 50mg was used, but caused people to become too sick with withdrawal effects, thus falling out of use as few people would take it. What has since been developed in 1986 is low dose naltrexone (LDN), in the 1.5 to 4.5mg range. This low dose has demonstrated some benefit in helping with autoimmune disease. There have been few published studies of limited research showing remarkable results with multiple sclerosis, scleroderma, Crohn's, HIV, fibromyalgia and Parkinson's disease.

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Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Deciding on a blog topic for this month was simple. August 12th marked 18 years since my 47-year-old mother passed away due to pressure ulcer complications. A flood of memories came rushing through, realizing just how much wound care has evolved throughout the years. A feeling of "if I only knew then, what I know now" type emotions. I cannot help but have a great deal of heartfelt empathy for caregivers and their loved ones with chronic wounds. My personal experiences have led me to my sense of gratification in what I do every day.

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Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Another day at Rose Cottage is over and I am remembering some events and pondering as I wait for my granddaughter to finish work and drop me off home. I have been volunteering here a while now and am getting used to being in a position of watching, listening and not having to react to everything as I am just an outsider helping out. I was a matron though, and the patterns within my brain are such that I must at least ponder at where we are, where we came from and where we are heading. ‘Ahhh,’ you are thinking she is going to bemoan modern nursing and call for a return to the good old days, well you’d be wrong. I am not sure it was all so good and with new blood, new technologies and modern versions of Flo, we will see our Scutari change and develop into a new and exciting place. Well you will, I will join my fellows here at some point and allow you to care and listen.

Michel Hermans's picture

By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

With a recent acute and serious vision problem, I have had to visit three ophthalmologists (all with different specialties) and a neurologist. I have undergone a series of tests, on the eyes as well as an MRI of the skull, brain and orbita, tests for the coagulatory system, atrial fibrillation and an ultrasound of the carotids.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

The signs of summer winding down are everywhere. Leaves are beginning to look 'tired', fall clothes fill the stores and 'back to school' ads are everywhere—to the chagrin of kids and joy of parents everywhere.

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Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

I have been referred to as the "crazy wound nurse" by many of my co-workers and patients throughout the years. I've been known to dance, sing, rap, and even do a cartwheel in the hallway when a wound has been given the status "HEALED." Why do I do this? No, I am not really crazy. I am just a passionate and caring wound nurse that has experienced both sides of the coin.

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