Pressure Ulcers

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By the WoundSource Editors

New Jersey Hospital Association Healthcare Business Solutions announced it has released a 4th edition of its highly successful publication, Pocket Guide to Pressure Ulcers, written by wound care experts, Jeffrey Levine, MD, AGSF, CMD, CWSP and Elizabeth Ayello, Ph.D., RN, ACNS-BC, CWON, MAPWCA, FAAN.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
fat grafting for pressure injuries

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

This month's blog topic idea came about from a recent conversation with a middle-aged patient with paraplegia. She had a stage 4 pressure injury due to being in her wheelchair long hours, along with a low BMI. I made the comment, "I wish I could give you a fat transplant." She laughed. She then asked, "Well, why not?" Later that day the topic of fat grafting popped up on social media in a spinal cord injury group I follow. I ended up chatting with a few spinal cord injury folks that were serious about coming up with funds to get fat grafting done. They all had a fear of, or a previous history of pressure injuries. These folks with past pressure injuries had used advanced wound care dressings, support surfaces, high-end cushions, supplements, negative pressure wound therapy, a slew of antibiotics, and even flap closures.

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Margaret Heale's picture
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patient repositioning for pressure injury prevention

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

This past fall, I attended the New England WOCN Society regional conference. While I am still processing all the great information that I absorbed there, I'd like to share with you some of the important discussions that came up on the topics of pressure injury staging and patient compliance with repositioning protocols.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
Nutrition and medicine

By Mary Ellen Posthauer, RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The World Union Wound Healing Society (WUWHS) held their 2016 meeting in historic Florence, Italy in September. The initial meeting of the WUWHS was held in Australia in 2000 and is convened every four years. I have had the unique opportunity to present in Paris, Toronto, Yokohama and this year in Florence on the topic of nutrition and wound healing. 4,226 clinicians attended the conference including 525 from the US. The convention center was a modern venue surrounded by the ancient walls of the Roman fortress.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
Risk factors for pressure injuries, medical nutrition therapy intervention

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) should be an integral part of your pressure Injury (ulcer) management plan. Malnutrition/undernutrition is a risk factor for pressure injury formation and prolongs the healing process. Since nutrition is one component of both the treatment and prevention plan (along with dressings, treatments and support surfaces), having a written MNT protocol assists the interdisciplinary team in achieving a positive outcome for the individual/patient. The collaborative, interdisciplinary approach should include the individual and their family/caregiver.

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Industry News's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Washington, DC – August 30, 2016 – The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) revised the Pressure Injury Staging System following a consensus conference in April. The response to the changes has been positive. To date, The Joint Commission (TJC) has adopted the new terminology and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been in discussions with the NPUAP to incorporate the new terminology. The rollout of the changes will be controlled by these agencies.

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Thomas Serena's picture
leadership in wound care

by Thomas E. Serena MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

"I believe we possess all the resources and talents necessary. But the facts of the matter are that we have never made the national decisions or marshaled the national resources required for such leadership."
-John F. Kennedy May 25, 1961

Cheryl Carver's picture
Stage 1 Pressure Injury - Darkly Pigmented Skin

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

I have worked all over the country as an educator. The same gaps in education arise everywhere. A few years ago, I began teaching skin color awareness as part of my course curriculum. I feel strongly about it being a part of my inservices and course education. Understanding skin color as it relates to assessment is critical in the prevention of pressure injuries.

Margaret Heale's picture
advancing wound care nursing skills

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

I was not at the April National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) meeting, but I do think some of critical commentary that has followed the announcement of the pressure injury staging system changes is flawed. Clearly designating the thickness of an injury to a defined wound stage makes sense and communicates a severity. All the NPUAP have done is clarify some detail that clinicians have had to manage previously, within a gray area. It is not the responsibility of the NPUAP, researchers or clinicians at the bedside to make up definitions to fit coding or legislators. It is important that researchers and bedside clinicians provide the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and legislators with research demonstrating how and why pressure ulcers occur.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
pressure ulcer terminology

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The April National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) consensus conference resulted in a terminology change from pressure ulcer to pressure injury, and also validated new terminology which more accurately describes pressure injury in intact and ulcerated skin. The previous staging system described both Stage 1 and Deep Tissue Injury as injured intact skin and the other stages described open ulcers. There has been confusion because the definitions for each of the stages referred to the injuries as "pressure ulcers". The term "suspected" was removed form the Deep Tissue Injury diagnostic label and Arabic numbers are now used instead of roman numerals.

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