Product Education

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By the WoundSource Editors

Health care professionals have a major responsibility for assuring patient safety and quality of care when making wound care product selections or recommending treatment options. This is particularly true for wound care.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Evangelia Athanasoula and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

The sorbion sachet wound dressing, manufactured by sorbion GmbH & Co. in Germany and marketed in the US by Alliqua Biomedical, is a high capacity dressing that absorbs and holds wound exudate, removes some wound debris, draws in and holds wound bacteria helping to reduce surface bioburden, and maintains a balanced moist wound environment. The dressing uses what it calls "hydration response technology" to accomplish these goals.

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By Rizwan Tai and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of adults between the ages of 18-79 with newly diagnosed diabetes has more than tripled in the last 30 years. Foot ulcers are a major complication of uncontrolled diabetes, and 25% of the patients will be affected with foot ulcers in their lifetime, the majority of which lead to lower extremity amputations.

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By Tedman L. Tan and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

The management of diabetic foot ulcers is becoming an increasingly significant concern with the growing population of patients with diabetes in the United States. Most amputations involving the lower extremity in patients with diabetes are preceded by foot ulcers, and in turn, lower extremity amputations are associated with a high 5-year mortality rate at around 45% among individuals with diabetes.1 Therefore, diabetic foot ulcers require special attention due to the possible life-threatening complications associated with such wounds

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gauze

By Keval Parikh and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

There are many different kinds of >wound dressings available. Choosing one to use depends on the unique characteristics of the wound. According to Watson and Hodgkin, the ideal wound dressing should exhibit a number of characteristics by providing the following: moisture and exudate management, prevention of saturation and strikethrough, diffusion of wound gases, microorganism protection, mechanical protection; localized temperature and pH control; removal/change comfort; wound odor management; cosmetic acceptability; non-allergenic composition; non-contamination of the wound bed; and cost-effectiveness.

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marathon liquid skin protectant

By Peter Smith and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Marathon® Liquid Skin Protectant by Medline Industries, Inc. is a versatile non-stinging barrier film that provides protection for at-risk skin or damaged skin. Marathon® comes in single use applicator tubes that have a built-in sponge tip. Each tube contains enough liquid skin protectant to cover an area of 10cm. The barrier film created is breathable, flexible and durable relative to other liquid skin products.

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By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

We, the wound care community, are doing it wrong! We are using FDA approved, expensive diagnostics and treatments while the solution for your diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, full-thickness burns and keloid scars are on the web and cost peanuts in comparison to a visit to your doctor.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Chinenye Queen Ezike and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Venous Leg Ulcers (VLUs) are the most common cause of lower extremity ulcerations, affecting about 1% of the US population. Recurrence rates for VLUs are also extremely high and ulcers can remain for weeks to years, even with appropriate treatment. More often than not, however, they are treated with inadequate compression and are complicated by poor patient compliance.

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By Carmelita Harbeson and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Hemostasis, the resolution of bleeding, consists of several intricate and controlled steps: platelet activation, coagulation, and vascular repair. Whether bleeding is caused by surgery, trauma, or wound debridement, hemostatic control is something we face daily, and luckily there are many products available to assist in this process. This blog describes one tool in our arsenal, WoundSeal® MD, a hemostatic powder and wound sealant.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

What is Bag Balm® and why is it the subject of a wound care blog? Bag Balm is over 100 years old, invented in 1899 to treat chapped and irritated cows' udders and teats. Of course, the Bag Balm was applied by hand to the cows' udder and teats and farmers noticed that not only were there cows doing better with healthy udders and teats, their hands were better—not chapped or reddened, not as sore, and much softer. Their calluses were reduced, too. Because of this, Bag Balm became indispensable to the farmers and virtually every farm kitchen had a green can of Bag Balm.