Product Education

Margaret Heale's picture
Medical supply waste

By Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

Like many people, you might go to recycling every month or so and be proud to deliver a few black bags of rubbish, and recycle most everything else. Many of you may have a thriving compost heap (mine is frequented by the biggest and fattest groundhog in the universe who eats produce instead of garbage). Like me, you might think of yourself as a responsible dweller of planet earth.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Zinc in wound healing

By Aletha Tippett MD

Well, what a surprise to find that what you have been doing all along is really the right thing to do even though you didn’t know the reason. Always, over the years doing wound care, I applied a thick layer of zinc oxide ointment around the patient’s wound, then put my dressing on the wound and covered it with a topping, usually plastic wrap pressed into the zinc oxide ointment.

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Samantha Kuplicki's picture
skin care moisturizers

By Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, AGCNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

There are currently hundreds of skin moisturizing products on the market for clinicians to choose from. It is often difficult to wade through various brands and formulations to determine which is appropriate to treat a specific skin issue, and even more is involved in understanding the function of each ingredient. Protecting the body’s functional barrier is integral to staving off pathogens and defending the body from infection.

Cheryl Carver's picture
off label drug prescription

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Providers may view off label drug use (OLDU) for wounds as the "new wave". However, if there is little or no scientific evidence supporting the practice, it can possibly lead to more problems than good. Keep in mind that not every health care setting embraces off label drug use. For example, state surveyors view OLDU differently in long-term care versus home care. Providers should avoid any risk of being involved in a pressure injury investigation. OLDU may be considered a factor in the event of such an investigation. Hospice patients are considered to be in more of a "dying with dignity" category, therefore OLDU may be considered more acceptable.

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Samantha Kuplicki's picture
comparative research on NPWT devices

by Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, AGCNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Recently, we've reviewed application and documentation strategies for negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), but what about navigating the different systems currently on the market? We know all devices have the mechanism of negative pressure in common, but what other characteristics need to be considered when selecting the right device for your patient? In this installment, we will become better acquainted with the characteristics of NPWT devices and how they differ for various systems.

Cheryl Carver's picture
making wound product selection decisions

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Whether you are a provider or a clinician, the challenge of wound dressing selection is ongoing. I have been an educator for quite some time now, and have found that the easiest way to teach dressing selection is by dressing category and wound depth.

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Terri Kolenich's picture
frequently asked wound care treatment questions

By Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

I travel to several states educating wound care providers and nurses in the long-term care setting. Many of the questions I get are the same whether I'm on the east or west coast. The one question that I encounter the most often during wound rounds or an education session is: "How do I know which treatment to use for this wound?"

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WoundSource Editors's picture
hydrocolloid dressing for wounds - granuflex border dressing

By the WoundSource Editors

Hydrocolloid dressings provide a moist and insulating healing environment which protects uninfected wounds while allowing the body's own enzymes to help heal wounds. These dressings are unique because they don't have to be changed as often as some other wound dressings and are easy to apply. Hydrocolloid dressings:

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    Cheryl Carver's picture
    wet-to-dry dressing changes using gauze

    By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

    The big debate continues in regards to using wet-to-dry dressings. One thing that is for certain though is that this type of dressing is frowned upon in long-term care facilities per the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) Guidelines for pressure ulcers. However, long-term care facilities are put at risk for citations when using wet-to-dry dressings for any wound type.

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    Laurie Swezey's picture
    aerobic proteus bacteria in a wound

    By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

    Activated charcoal has been used in various types of wound care dressings. Although activated charcoal in itself does not enhance wound healing, it can help to minimize the odors associated with wounds. This is important, as wound odor can be very distressing for the patient, and the patient's family and caregivers. Wound odor can impact the quality of life of individuals with strong, persistent wound odor to have feelings of embarrassment, depression and isolation.1

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