Product Education

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Carmelita Harbeson and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Compression therapies work to restore circulation, reduce edema, and enhance tissue stability. With the myriad of compression options available, sorting through which treatments are best for each patient can be a daunting task for clinicians. This post presents an introduction to Tubigrip™, a multi-purpose tubular compression bandage and focuses on its utilization in decreasing edema associated with venous and lymphatic conditions.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Brittany Charmaine Sumpter and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Drawtex™ wound dressings utilize a hydroconductive material to aid the clinician in wound bed preparation. It is a highly absorbent wound dressing that facilitates the movement of wound exudates into and through the dressing to the outer secondary material. The constant movement of wound fluids clears the wound bed of harmful wound byproducts that may slow down or prevent wound healing.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By James McGuire, DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

The world of wound care is getting more complicated by the day. New products emerge almost weekly and further confuse the practitioner who is bombarded with ads and weekly visits from company representatives who tout the benefits of their particular collagen or foam.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

Spring is finally here! At least according to the calendar it is spring but the snow on the ground in many places disputes this fact. Not only does spring herald new life and warmer weather, but it also launches the ‘meeting season’ (no, not ‘mating season’-that is a topic for another site!). Actually major meetings have already begun. The NPUAP biennial meeting was held this past February. The next major meeting on the horizon is the SAWC in May in Denver followed by the WOCN in Seattle in June. In the fall we have both the Clinical Symposium for Wound Care in October and the September SAWC in Las Vegas. Along the way, there are also outstanding regional and local meetings designed to educate, enlighten and invigorate. Some of these meetings are specialty specific, while others are interdisciplinary. Both types of meetings have their benefits and limitations.

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY, PT. 9

One of the most obvious things about being a health care professional is that our goal is to help people get better. The concepts of an ill patient saying to me, "Dr. Miller, I don't want to get better or worse, can you do something to keep me in this condition?" Seems ludicrous and more, improbable. I could not imagine any health care professional being successful if patients remained in the exact same condition weeks after treatment. As I have said in previous blogs, I recognize that while there are many variations on the definition of "better", I think it's safe to say that "better" means improved in some way, shape, or form.

Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

The responses that I have been getting from the blogs are terrific! It is wonderful to know that clinicians are interested, questioning, and wanting to know what is in products. So, now in 2012, we continue this blog with the topic of products and practice.

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Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

In follow up to comments and additional considerations of products, ingredients, and clinical practice, it is important to discuss several aspects of the topic. This blog has served thus far as a primer for the evolution of products both on the market today and currently under development.

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 4

I willingly confess that I enjoy being a maverick. Of course, at age 52 with two cats, a wonderful wife of 27 years, and two daughters (this order in no way implies favoritism), that term seems to be a bit of a stretch. As a wound care clinician and scientist, I am always on the lookout to find that new innovative dressing, technique, or technology that will help my patients just a little bit more than the next guy. I believe the trade term for my type of psychosis is called “Early Adopter.” I prefer to think of myself in terms of the little kid we all knew who had to have the newest toy first.

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Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Hydrogel dressings were one of the first wound care products to change the practice of drying out wounds using caustic agents. Hydrogels drove home the advanced theory of Dr. George D. Winter, referred to as “moist wound healing.” Winter was the scientist that identified and validated the theory that by providing a moist wound environment, the outcomes for patients were those of faster healing and stronger regenerated wounds tissue, with less scarring and pain.

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Diane Krasner's picture

From The Clinical Editor

By Diane Krasner PhD, RN, CWCN, CWS, MAPWCA, FAAN

Introduction

The push towards safety by regulators and payers reflects the evidence that safe healthcare practices have numerous benefits – from reducing sentinel events to improving quality outcomes and helping to avoid litigation (1, 2, 3, 4). The wound care community has been slow to adopt the safety mantra . . . but the time has come to put your “safety lenses” on and to view wound prevention and treatment as a safety issue.

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