Product Education

Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Skin protectants and moisture barrier products serve two purposes in patient care: first is to protect the skin from harmful stimuli (incontinence, wound drainage, saliva, gastric juices, etc.); second is to create a barrier between the skin and the environment. It is amazing that one product and basically one classification of ingredient can get the job done!

Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Looking for a moisturizer? Look no further than the faucet! Did you know that water is the ONLY moisturizing ingredient? It’s true. All of the other ingredients in popular skin and wound care moisturizers are simply to keep the water where we want it to be on our patient’s skin.

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By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Cleansers for skin and wound care have always been a topic of much discussion. How and why do we use skin cleansers? What are the differences between skin cleansers and soap? Can you use a skin cleanser in a wound? Why not? What should you use for wound cleansing?

Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, FACCWS

Making decisions in today’s wound care world must take several entities into account. The patient/client and the practitioner must work together to decide on a dressing protocol that meets the needs of both. Additionally, the needs of the practitioner’s employer, whether home care agency, hospital, or other facility, must also be considered (i.e. cost). Appropriate wound care product use must maintain a balance, satisfying the demands of all three entities.

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Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Over The Counter (OTC) Drug Labels

Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Oliver S. is a resident in a nursing home. You have consulted on his case for management of perineal excoriation and rash. Your orders included the use of a cleanser and a skin protectant (both products are on the facility formulary).