Product Selection

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Carmelita Harbeson and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Hemostasis, the resolution of bleeding, consists of several intricate and controlled steps: platelet activation, coagulation, and vascular repair. Whether bleeding is caused by surgery, trauma, or wound debridement, hemostatic control is something we face daily, and luckily there are many products available to assist in this process. This blog describes one tool in our arsenal, WoundSeal® MD, a hemostatic powder and wound sealant.

Blog Category: 
Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

What is Bag Balm® and why is it the subject of a wound care blog? Bag Balm is over 100 years old, invented in 1899 to treat chapped and irritated cows' udders and teats. Of course, the Bag Balm was applied by hand to the cows' udder and teats and farmers noticed that not only were there cows doing better with healthy udders and teats, their hands were better—not chapped or reddened, not as sore, and much softer. Their calluses were reduced, too. Because of this, Bag Balm became indispensable to the farmers and virtually every farm kitchen had a green can of Bag Balm.

Diana Gallagher's picture

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

I have always prided myself on my ability to place patients' needs as a top priority. Patients are people and each and every one is an individual. They have unique needs and desires. Their levels of education, both formal and life lessons, varies greatly. They relate to me and communicate with me on different levels. They may have the same need for education, but they each learn differently. Although there are commonalities, the differences are significant. All people appreciate knowing that they are a priority and that they matter. Admittedly, making every patient a priority is a juggling act at times. It clearly takes extra time and effort but going the extra mile has always been worth it. I believe that doing the right thing the first time saves time and effort in the long run.

Blog Category: 
Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Staying up-to-date with the latest in wound care can be challenging, given that there are new treatments being developed, research being reviewed, updates to guidelines and recommendations being published as well as new products coming out at a dizzying pace. How does today’s wound care professional stay abreast of the latest trends and news? In this segment, we'll look at some of the best resources available, whether you are new to wound care or a "lifer."

Blog Category: 
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Carmelita Harbeson and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Compression therapies work to restore circulation, reduce edema, and enhance tissue stability. With the myriad of compression options available, sorting through which treatments are best for each patient can be a daunting task for clinicians. This post presents an introduction to Tubigrip™, a multi-purpose tubular compression bandage and focuses on its utilization in decreasing edema associated with venous and lymphatic conditions.

Blog Category: 
Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

National Nurse's Week (May 6-12) clearly influenced me for this month's blog topic. I think about teamwork among nursing staff members. A joint effort is not only paramount in delivering quality health care, but can also help us with job satisfaction. It makes me think of a favorite quote by Helen Keller: "Alone we can do so little, together we can do so much." We can refer to teamwork in many different ways, but one thing remains certain: pulling together results in positive outcomes.

Blog Category: 
Colton Mason's picture

By Colton Mason

I love coffee. I often joke with my friends that drinking coffee is the only way I can get my eight glasses of water in every day. Now if you're a coffee junky like me, you can probably tell the difference between a great cup of coffee and one that's just so-so.

Blog Category: 
Lydia Corum's picture

By Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

What is a wound care patient?

A wound care patient is a person with an open area that is not healing. I hear wound care patients referred to as: the pressure ulcer, the hip wounds, the one that has legs that always smell like urine, the amputee that is going to lose the other leg, the non-compliant with the chronic wound, the drug addict. Where in nursing did we lose that perspective of the person behind the disease or illness? These are people with wounds that require our best effort in order to heal. They need our loving care, our education, and our assurance that all will be well.

Blog Category: 
Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

There has been a very interesting and disheartening development in the past two years. My practice has always had a small private wound care clinic, and we have always been busy with referrals from local physicians. But lately those referrals have evaporated, the reason being that the local physicians have become part of larger hospital-based systems. So now if they have a wound they refer it to the hospital wound center that is a part of their system.

Blog Category: 
Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

As we say goodbye to 2013 and usher in 2014, most of us reflect on the past and plan for the future. What does 2014 mean when we look ahead to wound care? This past year saw health care dominating the news in the USA; add a government shutdown, political divisiveness that polarized and in some cases paralyzed the nation, and of course continued worldwide economic and political upheavals, and the overall challenges can seem overwhelming.

Blog Category: