Product Selection

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

Spring is finally here! At least according to the calendar it is spring but the snow on the ground in many places disputes this fact. Not only does spring herald new life and warmer weather, but it also launches the ‘meeting season’ (no, not ‘mating season’-that is a topic for another site!). Actually major meetings have already begun. The NPUAP biennial meeting was held this past February. The next major meeting on the horizon is the SAWC in May in Denver followed by the WOCN in Seattle in June. In the fall we have both the Clinical Symposium for Wound Care in October and the September SAWC in Las Vegas. Along the way, there are also outstanding regional and local meetings designed to educate, enlighten and invigorate. Some of these meetings are specialty specific, while others are interdisciplinary. Both types of meetings have their benefits and limitations.

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Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

We've all experienced difficulty in getting dressings to stay on for as long as we need them to, especially when there are many commercial dressings that could (and should) remain in place for several days before they require changing.

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Thomas Serena's picture

By Thomas E. Serena MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

I had the honor of lecturing to an audience of mostly European physicians at the M.I.L.A.N. Diabetic Foot Conference this past February in Milan, Italy. My session this year focused on our current and ongoing research in point-of-care diagnostics. To date, we have enrolled more than a thousand patients in a dozen clinics across the United States. All of these trials led to the development of the first commercially available wound diagnostic, WOUNDCHEK (Systagenix, Gargarve, UK), approved in Europe last year (it has not yet received FDA clearance for use in the US). A revolutionary product, I imagined that it would have received rapid, wide-spread acceptance among my European colleagues. At the end of the presentation I asked for a show of hands: “How many of you are using the test in your clinics or hospitals.” In an audience of nearly one hundred, only three attendees raised their hands.

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Beth Hawkins Bradley's picture

By Beth Hawkins Bradley RN, MN, CWON

Finding the key to unlocking a non-healing chronic wound keeps us awake at night. Though we have, as bedside clinicians, learned much about the physiology and biochemistry of chronic wounds over the past decade, wound healing is not an exact science. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has become standard care for certain chronic wounds. Sometimes, however, wounds treated with this therapy do not progress as readily as we think that they should. This has led us to consider combining other wound care products with NPWT. This article will examine the rationale for using three products in combination with negative pressure.

Karen Zulkowski's picture

By Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

How many of you know how knowledgeable you are about wounds? Keeping up with the latest articles and treatments is difficult. This is especially true for a staff nurse that only encounters patient wounds occasionally. Larger facilities and home health agencies have wound nurses, but smaller facilities do not. Pressure ulcer knowledge has been examined for Registered Nurses across the United States using the Pieper Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Test. When urban versus rural nurses' knowledge was examined between rural Montana nurses and urban New York City nurses all scored at a "C" level. Similar testing at a Florida VA found nurses score 77% and only improved to 81% after education programs. Registered nurses that participated in the New Jersey Hospital Association pressure ulcer collaborative scored slightly higher on the Pressure Ulcer Knowledge test at 83%. However, percent correct is still a "B-" average. Certified wound care nurses scored at 93%.

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Beth Hawkins Bradley's picture

By Beth Hawkins Bradley RN, MN, CWON

How did you acquire your knowledge and skills around the application of NPWT dressings? Most of us learned by observing another clinician doing dressing applications, or from a manufacturer's representative. We likely just imitated what they did, largely winging it. In my work over the past few years, I have been surprised to learn that many excellent clinicians have gaps in technical ability. This article is intended to review principles of NPWT dressing application to increase the accuracy of your techniques. These tips are distilled from principles that are typical of manufacturer guidelines. It is always recommended that you read and follow the manufacturer’s guidelines for the product that you are using.

Ron Sherman's picture

By Ron Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H

Two hundred years ago, Joseph Joubert wrote: “To teach is to learn twice.” For me, preparing for a lecture or workshop is like learning the latest information all over again. But giving the lecture and pondering over the students’ questions is like learning a third time. This is one of the reasons that I so enjoy teaching.

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Sue Hull's picture

By Sue Hull MSN, RN, CWOCN

Here is an idea you will love!

What do you do with a blister? You know the problem. You discover a blister. If you don’t do anything, it will probably unroof and be open and vulnerable by the next time you see it.

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