Research

Thomas Serena's picture
Clinical Research

by Thomas E. Serena, MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

I have conducted numerous unblinded clinical trials, mostly evaluating cellular or tissue-based Products (CTPs). These trials do not easily lend themselves to blinding. However, when I slated this topic with the title “Unblinding the Blind" for my Association for the Advancement of Wound Care lecture track at next year’s spring Symposium on Advanced Wound Care, the organizers removed it and cited the lecture’s controversial nature. I thought that scientific research was the last frontier of free-wheeling discourse in the private sector, but here lurks the most challenging aspect of contemporary research in wound care: we woundologists do not demand increasing rigor in our trials. Outside of hyperbaric oxygen (HBOT) studies, we have not critically evaluated trial results.

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Margaret Heale's picture
Wound Research Data Review Including Outliers

by Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

When looking at randomized controlled trials one of the first things you read is a one liner, "subjects were matched," and there may be a list that includes stage of pressure injury, size of wound, age, sex, and a myriad of other things somebody decided to include. There may also be exclusion criteria such as uncontrolled blood sugar, obesity, and being over 60 years old. It makes sense to do this, and there is no doubt that once you have got homogenous groups and compare the outcome of one with another, after whatever intervention you wish to discover the worth of, the result may look gratifyingly convincing.

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Janet Wolfson's picture
new research in the field of lymphedema management

by Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

At the beginning of September, I attended the National Lymphedema Network International Conference in Dallas, TX. As with most conferences it was chock-full of new research, meet-ups with former colleagues, vendors with wonderful new and upgraded products, and clinical topics to improve direct care. Continue reading for some highlights that can improve care in your wound clinic for venous disease patients, as well as lymphedema and lipedema patients. Preoperative awareness of lymphedema was also highlighted at the conference.

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Industry News's picture

Providence, RI – August 19, 2016 – The Wound Healing Foundation (WHF), through the support of Medline Industries, is pleased to announce the creation of a new grant, the WHF Hyaluronic Acid Wound Healing Research Grant for the year 2016. This one-year $15,000 research grant is to stimulate research about hyaluronic acid in wound healing. Study proposals may include in vitro, in vivo, and/or clinical based studies. Interested candidates meeting the grant requirements should submit their proposals by September 19, 2016.

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Michel Hermans's picture
journal article review

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

The first time you see your name published as the lead author of an article you are filled with pride. If an article is rejected you are filled with frustration.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

by Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

I was fascinated by the incredible amount of money that was donated to various organizations on December 2nd – the day declared as a National Day of Giving. This movement started in 2012 by the 92nd Street Y and the United Nations Foundation as a response to the commercialization of Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

by Aletha Tippett MD

Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist originally approved by the FDA in the early 1980s for the treatment of heroin addiction. The high dose of 50mg was used, but caused people to become too sick with withdrawal effects, thus falling out of use as few people would take it. What has since been developed in 1986 is low dose naltrexone (LDN), in the 1.5 to 4.5mg range. This low dose has demonstrated some benefit in helping with autoimmune disease. There have been few published studies of limited research showing remarkable results with multiple sclerosis, scleroderma, Crohn's, HIV, fibromyalgia and Parkinson's disease.

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Michel Hermans's picture

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

Merriam Webster defines bias as "selecting or encouraging one outcome or answer over others." The Cochrane handbook states: "The reliability of the results of a randomized trial depends on the extent to which potential sources of bias have been avoided."

When designing a trial or even animal research, avoiding bias is difficult. In fact, it may be introduced unknowingly or deliberately.

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Ron Sherman's picture

by Ron Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H

My contribution to this column is very much overdue. Among other things, I have spent much of my time this past 12 months preparing to write my first "systematic review." The experience has been both illuminating and frustrating, and I am now feeling both respect for the art, and grief over its gross inadequacies.

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