Skin

Janet Wolfson's picture
A Multidisciplinary Approach to Incontinence

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

My current job as wound coordinator has pulled me into the world of incontinence and the many disciplines that care for people challenged by this disorder. I was previously acquainted with the therapy side as I worked with therapists certified in pelvic floor therapy. My work with venous edema acquainted me with medications that caused continence-challenged people to resort to absorbent adult briefs. As I work more closely with physicians, I am more familiar with medications to support weakened or sensitive pelvic muscles and nerves. On the nursing side, I have researched support surfaces, incontinence pads, and barrier creams. I see patients and occupational therapists working together to regain continence independence through problem-solving mobility issues.

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Cathy Wogamon's picture
Veteran with Spinal Cord Injury

By Cathy Wogamon, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, CWON, CFCN

Immobility and decreased sensation can cause major problems related to the skin in the patient with spinal cord injury. Even though the average age of the veteran with a spinal cord injury is increasing, there are still many younger veterans affected by spinal cord injuries. When skin issues arise in this population, the impact is not only physical but also emotional as skin issues sometimes make it difficult for the veteran to remain in their chairs, thereby decreasing mobility and socialization.

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Holly Hovan's picture
Geriatric Skin

by Holly M. Hovan, MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

With a growing population of Americans aged 65 or older, it is important to know what skin changes are normal and abnormal and what we can do in terms of treatment, education, and prevention of skin injuries.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
skin assessment and moisture-associated skin damage

by the WoundSource Editors

The performance of an accurate and complete skin assessment is of utmost importance to obtaining and maintaining healthy skin. Understanding the structure and function of the skin is key to the differentiation of normal from abnormal findings. Having this baseline knowledge aids in determining the patient's level of risk, how skin is damaged, the impact of moisture on the skin, the resulting type of moisture-associated skin damage (MASD), and whether current skin care protocols are effective and adequate.