Skin Care

Diane Krasner's picture

From The Clinical Editor

By Diane Krasner PhD, RN, CWCN, CWS, MAPWCA, FAAN

Introduction

The push towards safety by regulators and payers reflects the evidence that safe healthcare practices have numerous benefits – from reducing sentinel events to improving quality outcomes and helping to avoid litigation (1, 2, 3, 4). The wound care community has been slow to adopt the safety mantra . . . but the time has come to put your “safety lenses” on and to view wound prevention and treatment as a safety issue.

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Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Skin protectants and moisture barrier products serve two purposes in patient care: first is to protect the skin from harmful stimuli (incontinence, wound drainage, saliva, gastric juices, etc.); second is to create a barrier between the skin and the environment. It is amazing that one product and basically one classification of ingredient can get the job done!

Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Looking for a moisturizer? Look no further than the faucet! Did you know that water is the ONLY moisturizing ingredient? It’s true. All of the other ingredients in popular skin and wound care moisturizers are simply to keep the water where we want it to be on our patient’s skin.

Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Cleansers for skin and wound care have always been a topic of much discussion. How and why do we use skin cleansers? What are the differences between skin cleansers and soap? Can you use a skin cleanser in a wound? Why not? What should you use for wound cleansing?

Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Over The Counter (OTC) Drug Labels

Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Oliver S. is a resident in a nursing home. You have consulted on his case for management of perineal excoriation and rash. Your orders included the use of a cleanser and a skin protectant (both products are on the facility formulary).

Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

There are numerous types of dermal lesions that may affect the skin. Dermal lesions may be classified as either primary or secondary lesions:

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WoundSource Editors's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Psoriasis is a chronic, noncontagious skin disease resulting from an atypical autoimmune response which leads to accelerated skin growth and the formation of skin lesions. Psoriasis causes skin cells that typically take a month to grow to form in a matter of days. This in turn leads to the buildup of cells on the surface of the skin which then form silvery scales over red, dry, itchy patches called plaques. The most common form of psoriasis (and the focus of this article) is the abovementioned plaque psoriasis, also referred to as psoriasis vulgaris, accounting for 80-90% of psoriatic patients.