Skin Care

Sharon Baronoski's picture
Obesity

By Sharon Baranoski, MSN, RN, CWCN, APN-CCNS, FAAN and Kimberly LeBlanc, PhD, RN, WOCC©, IIWCC

Editor's note:This blog post is part of the WoundSource Trending Topics series, bringing you insight into the latest clinical issues and advancement in wound management, with contributions by the WoundSource Editorial Advisory Board.

Fabiola Jimenez's picture
Nurses communicating about patient

by Fabiola Jimenez, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

To tell you the truth, I was not exactly sure what I was getting into when I decided to go to Wound Ostomy and Continence (WOC) nursing school. My reference was my experience during my Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) clinical rotations where I worked with a colorectal surgeon and the Nurse Practitioner (NP). The patients we saw had everything to do with a WOC’s expected body of knowledge.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
moisture-associated skin damage

by the WoundSource Editors

It has long been known in clinical practice that long-term exposure of the skin to moisture is harmful and can lead to extensive skin breakdown. The term moisture-associated skin damage was coined as an umbrella term to describe the spectrum of skin damage that can occur over time and under various circumstances. To have a moisture-associated skin condition, there must be moisture that comes in contact with that skin.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
incontinence-associate dermatitis prevention

by the WoundSource Editors

Although clinical practice is hampered by a lack of rigorous studies, standardized terminology, or definitions of incontinence-associated skin damage, it is well known among health care providers that this damage places patients at increased risk for pressure ulcer/injury development. The worldwide challenge represented by incontinence-associated skin damage prompted the development of a global expert panel on the topic in 2014. The group, chaired by Professor Dimitri Beeckman, a leading authority on the topic, collaborated to develop international best practice guidelines for prevention and treatment of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) that were published in 2015.1

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
complications associated with MASD

by the WoundSource Editors

Best practice in skin care focuses on the prevention of skin breakdown and the treatment of persons with altered skin integrity. When we ask what causes skin damage we should consider the conditions that can harm the skin, including excessive moisture and overhydration, altered pH of the skin, the presence of fecal enzymes and pathogens, and characteristics of incontinence such as the volume and frequency of the output and whether the output is urine, feces, or both. If left untreated or not treated appropriately, moisture-associated skin damage or MASD can lead to further complications such as Candida infections, bacterial overgrowth, pressure injuries, and medical adhesive-related skin injury (MARSI). These can occur individually or overlap, which can make them even more difficult to manage. Today our focus is to discuss each of these complications of MASD in more detail and address some of the most common issues leading to their development.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
repositioning for pressure injury prevention

By the WoundSource Editors

Pressure ulcers/injuries are extremely prevalent, particularly in long-term and other care facilities, and primarily affect older adults, those with cognitive impairment, mobility issues or individuals who are bedfast. Understanding the best ways to prevent skin damage before it develops into a significant injury is critical to improving patient outcomes and reducing costs.1 This brief guide will introduce nurses and other health care professionals to pressure injury prevention best practices to reduce the risk of patients developing these preventable wounds.

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Holly Hovan's picture
Keywords: 
elderly patient skin tear prevention

By Holly M. Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

I'm sure you're all familiar with the terms "prednisone skin," "thin skin," "fragile skin," or "easily bruises." One or all of these phrases are commonly used to describe our geriatric population's aging skin. As we age, so does our skin. Skin loses elasticity and often gains wrinkles. Skin conditions that were maybe never present throughout life can crop up with aging. Keep in mind that the environment and different exposures (to sunlight, smoking, and stress) can cause our skin to age differently. Additionally, certain drugs, obesity, diet/lifestyle, habits, exercise, repetitive movements, and family history can also influence how our skin ages. Exposure to radiation (for cancer treatment) can also cause skin changes several years after treatment is complete. Regardless of the reason, as we age, our skin composition changes, and undoubtedly the risk for skin tears increases.

Industry News's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Expansion of Sensi-Care® portfolio in $500m market for skin care wipes, providing customers with advanced, evidence-based solutions to cleanse, moisturize and protect patients' skin.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
long-term care wound education

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

I tell everyone that long-term care is the toughest arena for a wound consultant. However, it can also be the most rewarding. The focus of this month's blog is to give you an inside look of what really goes on in nursing homes versus other health care settings.