Skin Care

Martin Vera's picture
anatomy of the skin, the body's largest organ

By Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

On our last encounter we discussed wound bed preparation and the TIME framework. What I wish to accomplish with this post is to make it easier to understand the skin, the changes it undergoes as we age, and pave the way for the phases of wound healing—all of which are essential in becoming a better clinician.

Cheryl Carver's picture
fungi candida albicans 3D

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

It doesn't matter where exactly I am educating, I see it everywhere: the vicious cycle of chronic intertrigo and/or candida infections (candidiasis) of the skin in the long-term care arena. Skin and soft tissue infections are the third most common infection in long-term care.

Samantha Kuplicki's picture
skin care moisturizers

By Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, AGCNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

There are currently hundreds of skin moisturizing products on the market for clinicians to choose from. It is often difficult to wade through various brands and formulations to determine which is appropriate to treat a specific skin issue, and even more is involved in understanding the function of each ingredient. Protecting the body’s functional barrier is integral to staving off pathogens and defending the body from infection.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture
dry skin and pressure ulcers

By Aletha Tippett MD

The other day I received a phone call from a dear physician friend of mine who works tirelessly in the field of pressure support and pressure ulcer prevention. He had been talking to some older nurses who told him that "in their day" they kept their patients lubed up and never had a skin problem. He knows that I advocate vigorous skin lubrication and sought guidance.

Cheryl Carver's picture
Long-Term Care Wound Management Formulary

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

With approximately $20 billion being spent a year on advanced wound care supplies, cost containment is a sought after goal. Long-term care facilities battle cutting costs under one reimbursement system like everyone else, but I assure you this challenge can be simplified, while continuing to bolster quality of care. I have learned that to contain cost, you must use experience, knowledge, and strong project management. So how do we accomplish this? I have broken down a cost containment plan for your long-term care facility. These key points will help you.

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Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Being an independent wound care education consultant in long-term care, I get a lot of questions regarding moisture-associated skin damage (MASD). Is it MASD or a pressure ulcer? When do I change it from MASD to pressure ulcer in my documentation?

Laurie Swezey's picture
Skin moisture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Bariatric patients present a special challenge in terms of skin care and prevention of pressure ulcers. Once damage to the skin occurs, bariatric patients heal more slowly due to decreased vascularity of the skin and reduced perfusion of adipose tissue. Bariatric patients are at high risk for acute wounds, pressure ulcers, venous ulcers, non-healing surgical wounds and diabetic wounds of the foot.

Cheryl Carver's picture
Fairground

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

My approach to long-term care education has always been to have fun and leave a lasting impression so that my audience will learn. Anyone that has been to one of my skin and wound care classes will validate this (*wink wink*).

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Remedy Products by Medline

By Cerise Adams and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Our skin is the largest organ in our body requiring a significant amount of vascular support to stay healthy and protective. As we get older, our circulation slows down just when our skin needs more support and more nutrition to continue to function. Besides regular cleansing and proper moisturizing, our skin needs nutrients to maintain its ideal function. The Medline Remedy skin care line has attempted to provide that with a topical, bioavailable formula that is antinflammatory and easily absorbed by skin cells.

WoundSource Editors's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Health care professionals have a major responsibility for assuring patient safety and quality of care when making wound care product selections or recommending treatment options. This is particularly true for wound care.

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