Skin Care

Diana Gallagher's picture

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

I recently had the honor of participating in a meeting of the Wound Ostomy Continence Nursing Certification Boar> (WOCNCB®). My role was to assist the Foot Care Committee with the evolution of the exam for certification in foot care nursing. All WOCNCB exams are expanding to a larger format based on the recommendations of the testing industry. The committee worked diligently to assure that item inclusion matched the test blueprint which in turn matched the job analysis that had been completed earlier this year. There is SO MUCH work that goes on behind the scenes to maintain examinations that are worthy of the WOCNCB's "Gold Standard." Participating in this meeting was truly an honor. As one of the members of the original committee for foot care nursing, I could not have been prouder of the progress that has been made in the past decade.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
marathon liquid skin protectant

By Peter Smith and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Marathon® Liquid Skin Protectant by Medline Industries, Inc. is a versatile non-stinging barrier film that provides protection for at-risk skin or damaged skin. Marathon® comes in single use applicator tubes that have a built-in sponge tip. Each tube contains enough liquid skin protectant to cover an area of 10cm. The barrier film created is breathable, flexible and durable relative to other liquid skin products.

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Margaret Heale's picture

Yy Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Hi blog buddies, Matron Marley here. I may be an ex-matron, but I may just have some gems for you. Today I would like to cast the threads (strings even) of time back to when I was a new nurse rather than a matron. The reason being the change happened then. I remembered it today when a rather frail lady caught her arm on a door mechanism. It tore such a huge triangle of her delicate skin, and my goodness did it bleed. I put on the gloves I keep in my pocket and pressed several napkins on it while the nurse went for supplies. She returned promptly with gloves, hand gel, gauze, skin prep, saline, cotton swabs, Xeroform, net and Steri-Strips™ (great invention, right up there with Velcro and cyanoacrylate).

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

Health care professionals recognize there seem to be 'seasons' for certain diseases and conditions. Spring and fall see a rise in flare ups of gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and seasonal allergies. Summer months bring an increase in traumatic events such as drownings, gunshot wounds and automobile accidents. Development of pressure ulcers does not follow a seasonal pattern—they occur at a higher than acceptable frequency throughout the year.

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Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

I was in the shower getting ready for my day volunteering at the nursing home and my mind bemoaned again how much I miss bathing. Relaxing in a deep hot bath, preferably with bubbles, background music and a cool drink...heavenly! Then I started thinking about how much the process of personal hygiene has changed since I was matron, way back when. As a child we bathed on Sundays which was great because the house was warmer on Sundays. I remember being really surprised when I went into nursing that we washed patients every day. By the time I was matron we had got rid of rubber draw sheets and had plastic ones. The rubber absorbed some of the odor from the urine, quite unpleasant. Linen changes were more frequent and we ran out of linen less frequently than earlier in my career. Most hospitals had their own laundry back then.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

There was an inquiry a couple months ago for a blog about biotherapy. Biotherapy refers to the use of animals for treatment and therapy for humans. This is a topic of great interest to me and I hope to others. When I was preparing to do maggot therapy on a patient the other week she asked me if I watched Wild Kingdom. I told her no, I live Wild Kingdom. We laughed, but that is somewhat true. I use maggots and leeches routinely and have for ten or more years.

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Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Skin tears are a common problem among the elderly due to increased skin fragility associated with aging. Due to the increasing prevalence of this problem, and the potential for poor and/or delayed wound healing in the elderly population, nurses should be aware of prevention strategies for skin tears, as well as management of skin tears once they have occurred.

Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

I have been living with my daughter for almost a year and helping out at a nursing home where my granddaughter works. I don't remember having this problem last year but my skin is just on fire at times, itchy, itchy, itchy! I found a cream but ran out and couldn't remember what it was called. When I got to the pharmacy and told the lady there that I was in search of a product whose name I thought sounded like 'Narnia' she pointed me in the right direction. Then, to my surprise, she added, "but remember not to go through the wardrobe door or you might get more than you bargained for." We laughed so much I remembered I best go to the feminine hygiene section. I just wanted a slim little pad, you know for the odd cough or sneeze, but—ohhh—what a choice!

Karen Zulkowski's picture
Skin Conditions

By Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

I previously discussed the need for a complete head-to-toe skin assessment. Certainly this can tell you whether or not the person is dehydrated, has open or discolored areas, and many other things about their overall health. Color, for example, can give you clues to additional problems such as vitamin and mineral deficiencies that can show on the skin.

Karen Zulkowski's picture

By Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

Looking at a person's skin from head to toe is an important nursing function. Certainly nurses document this on the patient's admission, but not so much thereafter. Often the CNA is the first person to notice a problem. Yet there may not be good communication between disciplines or training of the CNA to understand the significance of what they are observing.