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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Preventing Surgical Site Infections

By the WoundSource Editors

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) define a surgical site infection (SSI) as "an infection that occurs after surgery in the part of the body where the surgery took place." The CDC go on to say the infection can be superficial involving just the skin or more serious infections can occur that involve deeper structures, such as tissue under the skin, organs, or implanted devices or materials. The CDC offer tools and guidelines to prevent SSIs and provide education to the public. Public education includes tips and advice on how to prevent patient surgical sites from becoming infected. Although such steps may not always prevent a surgical wound from becoming infected, it is always important to involve the patient in postoperative care.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Factors Contributing to Complex Wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

A vast percentage of wounds become chronically stalled because of mixed etiology and other underlying comorbid medical conditions. This means the wound is multifactorial, and using a singular approach won’t be enough. Lower extremity wounds, for example, can have diabetes, venous and arterial issues, and pressure all as factors playing into the same wound.

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
Patient and Provider

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

As summer gives way to fall, one of the first thoughts most of us have is back to school. Patients and caregivers often feel as though every day is the first day of school and they are being asked to take the final exam before they have learned anything. Learner readiness is the cornerstone of an effective teaching/learning process.

Bruce Ruben's picture

By Bruce E. Ruben MD

Today in 2014, there should be no question that tobacco use is one of the worst things you can do to your body. There have been hundreds of scientific studies. This subject is extremely well documented.

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

The new year has begun. Many of us have made resolutions with the best of intentions. Exercise more, lose weight, eat healthy foods, keep blood sugar in a healthy range, stop smoking and using smokeless tobacco, watch less television. The list goes on and on. I am no stranger to not keeping my New Year's resolutions beyond a month or two. The best way to keep a resolution is to make it realistic. Make your goals achievable. Don't resolve to run a marathon if you cannot walk around the block. Rather than vowing to lose 50 pounds, set a goal of 10. Once you have lost 10 pounds resolve to lose another 10 and so on.

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA, WCC

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY, PT. 16

As I write my blog, I wonder whether anyone really reads it. I know that my wife and daughters do, because they have no choice. For all the foibles my 24 year old is quick to point out --Dad, you’re not really going to wear that; Dad, you have a stain on your shirt; Dad, you need to empty the cat litter (to which I reply, “why, they didn't eat what I poured them yet!”)--, she has commented on an occasion or two, “That was funny” or, “Yeah, it’s pretty good this time.”

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Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Patient care must always be centered holistically, considering the specific problem that the patient is being treated for, as well as all other factors that may affect patient wellbeing. Wound care is no different: in addition to wound assessment and treatment, all other considerations that may impact the patient must be taken into account. Such considerations may include social, psychological, physical, nutritional, and lifestyle factors. Overlooking one of these important realms may lead to non-adherence on the part of the patient, which in turn may lead to a non-healing, chronic wound.