Ulcers

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
wound care journal club

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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Laurie Swezey's picture
superficial venous insufficiency ulcer

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Lower extremity venous insufficiency ulcers represent approximately 80% of the leg ulcers typically seen in wound care facilities. The following statistics help to bring home the seriousness and chronicity of this common health problem:

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Laurie Swezey's picture
Skin moisture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Bariatric patients present a special challenge in terms of skin care and prevention of pressure ulcers. Once damage to the skin occurs, bariatric patients heal more slowly due to decreased vascularity of the skin and reduced perfusion of adipose tissue. Bariatric patients are at high risk for acute wounds, pressure ulcers, venous ulcers, non-healing surgical wounds and diabetic wounds of the foot.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

by Rizwan Tai and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of adults between the ages of 18-79 with newly diagnosed diabetes has more than tripled in the last 30 years. Foot ulcers are a major complication of uncontrolled diabetes, and 25% of the patients will be affected with foot ulcers in their lifetime, the majority of which lead to lower extremity amputations.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

by Aletha Tippett MD

This month's blog is in response to a comment on Recognizing and Treating Wounds Caused by Pyoderma Gangrenosum:
"What is green clay? Where do you get it? What does it do? Thanks for discussing pg in your blog. I'm working with a person whose ulcer is identical to the photo."