Venous Ulcers

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Carmelita Harbeson and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Compression therapies work to restore circulation, reduce edema, and enhance tissue stability. With the myriad of compression options available, sorting through which treatments are best for each patient can be a daunting task for clinicians. This post presents an introduction to Tubigrip™, a multi-purpose tubular compression bandage and focuses on its utilization in decreasing edema associated with venous and lymphatic conditions.

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Michel Hermans's picture

By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

In the first part of this series on the challenges of conducting clinical trials in wound care, I discussed factors that include patient populations and lesion prevalence. Additional criteria and conditions of the clinical trial will be further examined in this blog.

Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Wound care diagnostics includes examination of wounds for the purpose of wound classification. Why does it matter? It matters because treatment varies greatly depending on the type of wound. For example, venous insufficiency ulcers are treated differently than arterial insufficiency ulcers. Failing to differentiate between these wounds could mean the loss of a limb. Let’s take a look at some of the commonly used diagnostics in wound care.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

Once the individual has been thoroughly assessed for palliative care and his or her objectives and needs have been discussed, the wound care provider must determine the wound management strategy to follow. This strategy will depend upon the type of wound being treated for palliation. A summary of each type of wound and an appropriate palliative strategy are listed below, including factors such as removal of the wound cause, pain and drainage management, and odor control:

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Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Compression therapy is the “gold standard” for the treatment of venous ulcers. However, compression therapy is not a one-size-fits-all treatment and the clinician must decide on the right type of compression therapy for the individual client in order to prevent complications from occurring, such as ischemia and necrosis.

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