Wound Bed Preparation

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

Bioburden: In wound care, this refers to the number of microorganisms that contaminate the wound bed.

Biofilm: This is made up of complex microbial communities containing bacteria and fungi. The microorganisms synthesize and secrete a protective matrix that attaches the biofilm firmly to a living or non-living surface.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Wound Care Journal Club Review

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
surgical instruments for debridement

by the WoundSource Editors

One of the greatest challenges when dealing with biofilms in chronic wounds is identifying their existence in the first place. The extracellular polymeric substance or EPS on biofilms essentially is an invisible cloak that protects and hides biofilms from both the body's immune system and antimicrobial therapies. This biofilm property keeps the wound from advancing through the phases of wound healing and thus remaining in the inflammatory phase, thereby allowing further proliferation of biofilms. This is a common theme in wounds with biofilms, but other signs and symptoms will depend on the type and degree of functional impairment the host experiences. Types of inflammatory cells seen may be polymorphonuclear neutrophils, leucocytes, or mononuclear cells, but the type will depend on the predominating immune response of the host.

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Martin Vera's picture
wound healing and wound bed preparation

By Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

Wound bed preparation has become the gold standard model for proper wound assessment. It allows us clinicians to identify and breakdown local barriers to wound healing. Throughout our health care careers, we have seen it over and over again: the collective emphasis on standards of care, evidence-based practice, and cost-effectiveness in order to achieve positive outcomes for our patients.The wound bed preparation model supports all of these aspects of care delivery.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
wound care literature review club

By Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Cheryl Carver's picture
wet-to-dry dressing changes using gauze

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

The big debate continues in regards to using wet-to-dry dressings. One thing that is for certain though is that this type of dressing is frowned upon in long-term care facilities per the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) Guidelines for pressure ulcers. However, long-term care facilities are put at risk for citations when using wet-to-dry dressings for any wound type.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
Staphylococcus aureus biofilm

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

One of my favorite topics to discuss in wound care is biofilms. When I conduct wound care in-services or trainings, I always ask the audience, "Who wants to tell me what a biofilm is?" There is silence. From that point, I proceed to tell my little story about biofilms. It sounds a little like this...You know when we go to bed at night, get up in the morning and feel that sticky film on our teeth? We brush our teeth with a minty-fresh toothpaste. Now our teeth feel clean. By the next morning, that sticky, fuzzy feeling returns, right? Or, when your pet's water dish develops that slimy swamp layer and then you change it? Well that, my folks, is a biofilm!

Michel Hermans's picture
scapel for debridement

By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

There are a number of general rules in surgery. Among these: dead space has to be avoided. interestingly enough, there is virtually no real scientific documentation about this topic but everybody knows this to be true (in ulcers this, of course, applies to fistulae, crevices, etc.).

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