Wound Dressings

Thomas Serena's picture
Frequently Asked Questions

By Thomas E. Serena, MD, FACS

Conceived in the operating theater and born in the home, surgical site infections (SSIs) reach maturity in the outpatient wound clinic. The woundologist, whether surgically trained or not, must understand the prevention and treatment of SSIs and wound dehiscence. For the past two years I have had the honor of giving the SSI lecture for the WoundSource Practice Accelerator™. This year listeners had more questions than I could answer on the call or address individually. I decided to dedicate this blog to the most frequently asked questions from the October presentation.

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Hy-Tape International's picture
Management Strategies for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

By Hy-Tape International

According to a published study, the global prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is 6.3%, with male patients and older adults being the most likely to be affected.1 This prevalence, coupled with the potential for complications and the severe effect on quality of life the condition can have, makes DFUs one of today's most serious health care issues. To reduce the effects of DFUs and improve outcomes for patients, it is critical that health care professionals rapidly identify DFUs and implement best practice dressing and management strategies.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Entropic Wound Cycle

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Article Title: Using the Entropic Wound Cycle as the Basic for Making Effective Treatment Choices
Authors: Mcguire, J, Sebag JA, Solnik, J
Journal: WoundSource
Reviewed by: Cindy H. Duong, class of 2021, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Biofilm

By the WoundSource Editors

Biofilm: this term is frequently used in the wound care space, but biofilm continues to be largely undertreated in wound care. What do the bedside nurse or clinician need to know about biofilm? Should clinicians care less about biofilm on a maintenance or palliative wound versus a wound they are actively trying to heal? Let's address these questions and get to the root of the biofilm in managing complex wound cases.

Kathy Gallagher's picture
Acute Surgical Wound Service

By Kathy Gallagher, DNP, APRN-FNP, CMC, UMC, BC, WCC, CWS, FACCWS

In 2010, Christiana Care Health System, a 1,000 bed Level I trauma center in Wilmington, Delaware, introduced an acute surgical wound service (ASWS) integration plan in with a single dedicated nurse practitioner, trauma surgeon, and administrative leader. Subsequently, trauma patients with complex wounds experienced decreased morbidity and length of stay. Closely aligned with these numbers, their patient days of negative pressure wound therapy fell from 11+ days in 2010 to 8.2 days in 2018, representing one of the lowest in the nation.

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Hy-Tape International's picture
Secondary Dressings

By Hy-Tape International, Inc.

Secondary dressings can be an effective tool to protect the primary dressing or provide additional functionality beyond the primary dressing. Hydrocolloid or foam dressings can provide protection for the wound area and manage excess exudate. However, they can also significantly add to the cost and time of wound care. This makes it critical that health care professionals implement effective practices to maximize the wear time of secondary dressings.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

Periwound skin management is just as important as wound bed preparation in wound healing. The goal of periwound management is to maintain an optimal moist wound healing environment while preventing skin breakdown and infection. Skin is more vulnerable in patients with certain comorbidities and conditions. Periwound skin breakdown is just one of the culprits that delay wound healing and increase pain. It is important to identify conditions and risk factors early in your wound assessment to help prevent any risk of wound progress declination.

Emily Greenstein's picture
Wound Care

by Emily Greenstein, APRN, CNP, CWON, FACCWS

"When I grow up, I want to be a wound care specialist." That's not something you hear kids going around saying. Sure, kids want to be doctors or nurses. But wound care specialist?

When you think about it, being a wound specialist is not a glamorous position, unlike being a neurosurgeon. The best quote that I ever heard from a colleague of mine was, "No one wants to do wound care; wound care isn't sexy." This may be true, but what is wound care then? To me it is ever changing, it is learning new things (most of which are not found in text books), and it is about helping patients heal both emotionally and physically from a chronic condition.

Hy-Tape International's picture
Preventing Cross-Infection

by Hy-Tape International

Infections are common and serious complications associated with post-surgical wounds. In wounds resulting from clean surgery, 8% become infected among the general population and 25% among those over 60 years of age. Preventing these infections can help reduce costs, improve patient outcomes, and save lives. It is critical that health care professionals understand the risk of cross-contamination and take steps to prevent it.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Evaluating Patient Risk Factors

by the WoundSource Editors

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most prevalent surgical wound complications, comprising approximately 15% of all health care–associated infections, with more than 500,000 reported yearly.1 Preventing SSIs is perhaps the best way to prevent further surgical wound complications.

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