Wound Dressings

Cheryl Carver's picture
wet-to-dry dressing changes using gauze

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

The big debate continues in regards to using wet-to-dry dressings. One thing that is for certain though is that this type of dressing is frowned upon in long-term care facilities per the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) Guidelines for pressure ulcers. However, long-term care facilities are put at risk for citations when using wet-to-dry dressings for any wound type.

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Samantha Kuplicki's picture
DME products

by Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Ordering wound care dressing supplies can prove to be a frustrating task for many providers and clinicians. Unfortunately, I have encountered many health care providers that describe feelings of dread when working with their durable medical equipment (DME) counterparts.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
Wound Dressing Supplies

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

I feel like I am spinning my wheels on this warm sunny day in Ohio. My passion for wound care continues to grow, but I have days like these every once in a while. I always say, "We don't know what we don't know, right?" So I keep chipping away to educate and mentor other health care professionals.

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Laurie Swezey's picture
wound care 101 - wound debridement

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

There are four main types of debridement: mechanical, autolytic, enzymatic, and surgical. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages. Let’s take a look at each method individually:

Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Keywords: 
stopwatch

by Aletha Tippett MD

Wound cleansing is an interesting dilemma. What? How can that be a dilemma? Everyone knows that you cleanse a wound before dressing it. This is what has been taught for years. Wound cleansing began in the late 19th or early 20th century once the germ theory was proposed and accepted, and hygiene was successful in reducing infections and death, and improving wound outcomes.

Laurie Swezey's picture
maceration of periwound skin

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

A wound that is too moist can be as detrimental to wound healing as a wound that is too dry. When a wound is too moist, the skin surrounding the wound, known as the periwound, can become macerated. Skin that is macerated is vulnerable to breakdown, leading to a possible increase in wound size.

What can be done to protect the vulnerable periwound? There are several prevention strategies that can be used to prevent maceration and further skin breakdown.

Colton Mason's picture
healthcare caffeine

Jolt #4: Healthcare Caffeine, WoundSource Edition
by Colton Mason

Part 2 in a series exploring the latest innovations in soft silicone wound care dressings. For Part 1, click here.