Wound Dressings

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

Welcome, Colton Mason, to the WoundSource blog forum. I enjoyed your opening blog on cost versus price and love your Healthcare Caffeine image. You are so correct, looking at overall cost is what is important, not necessarily the price of a product. And it reminds me how we need to look at the whole picture to determine the correct approach for controlling cost

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Lydia Meyers's picture

By Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

What is a wound care patient?

A wound care patient is a person with an open area that is not healing. I hear wound care patients referred to as: the pressure ulcer, the hip wounds, the one that has legs that always smell like urine, the amputee that is going to lose the other leg, the non-compliant with the chronic wound, the drug addict. Where in nursing did we lose that perspective of the person behind the disease or illness? These are people with wounds that require our best effort in order to heal. They need our loving care, our education, and our assurance that all will be well.

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Lindsay Andronaco's picture

By Lindsay D. Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Part 2 in a series on skin failure
For Part 1, Click Here

In March of 1989 the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) convened, during which Karen Lou Kennedy first described the Kennedy Terminal Ulcer (KTU) phenomenon. A KTU is an unavoidable skin breakdown or skin failure that is thought to be a perfusion problem exacerbated by vascular/profusion insufficiency, organ failure, and/or the dying process. A KTU is a visible sign, an explanation, of what is transpiring within the patient.

Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Here I am again, Matron Marley, working as a volunteer in the local nursing home on just my second visit. I had a little difficulty getting in and discovered it was because of the door lock alarm on a resident. Such a good idea but a bit irritating. I managed to sneak in while the resident moved away briefly and entered into a bright airy reception area, so welcoming. The first home I ran was really dingy with cold stone steps to the 1st floor where the ‘geri’ ward was. Today I am greeted by a woman about my age with a pocket book asking, “Is the bus here yet, I have to pick up Robbie.” I heard the door click as she neared it, locking out my granddaughter who works here. I coaxed her away from the door with a promise to help her find the bus down a long hallway. It is soon revealed that she is a wanderer and spends much of her time trying to exit the building. Her mention of the bus brought to mind a patient I'd once had named Mable.

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Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Well, I was a matron such a long time ago when we still had candy stripers and you swallowed tablets or wrote on them with chalk. My granddaughter is doing some work at a local nursing home and offered to show me around. I held my breath as we entered, to assess the OOS (odor offense scale), something I learned when doing nursing home assessments way back when. A breath out and a slow even breath in through the nose and- mmm! Most unexpected, it must be almost lunchtime. Quite different from my day. Today's chat is about why.

Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Dressing changes can be painful experiences for clients. Pain is often not addressed or may be addressed inadequately. Pain is a significant issue for many clients and can present a challenge to the treating practitioner.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

In reading through the recent WoundSource blog archives, I just had to write in support of Dr. Ron Sherman’s blog on our perception of maggot therapy. His blog was in response to a reader claiming "only inexperienced providers" use maggot therapy. Dr. Sherman's response to this reader was dead on target. As usual, he is very evidence-based and all-inclusive in his comments. I totally agree that the comment about inexperienced providers is insulting, and disrespectful of a tremendous resource.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

The great medical pioneer, Dr. Paul Brand, was right when he said it's not about medicine, it's about mechanics. Think of the ulcers you are asked to see and treat. I hope the first question you ask about any wound is "how did this get here?" If the mechanics of a wound are not addressed, the medicine will not be successful.

Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

We've all experienced difficulty in getting dressings to stay on for as long as we need them to, especially when there are many commercial dressings that could (and should) remain in place for several days before they require changing.

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Laurie Swezey's picture
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By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Skin grafting of surgical wounds is performed for wounds that are difficult to close using traditional closure methods, such as staples or sutures. They may also be used for wounds that are expected to result in severe scarring, which may have psychological or physical repercussions for the patient. Skin grafting serves three main purposes: it covers the wound, minimizes scarring and speeds healing.

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