Wound Dressings

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

by Aletha Tippett MD

Welcome, Colton Mason, to the WoundSource blog forum. I enjoyed your opening blog on cost versus price and love your Healthcare Caffeine image. You are so correct, looking at overall cost is what is important, not necessarily the price of a product. And it reminds me how we need to look at the whole picture to determine the correct approach for controlling cost.

Margaret Heale's picture

Perspective of Nursing Care from Past to Future by Matron Marley

by Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Dressing changes can be painful experiences for clients. Pain is often not addressed or may be addressed inadequately. Pain is a significant issue for many clients and can present a challenge to the treating practitioner.

Types of Pain
There are four types of pain highlighted in the World Union of Wound Healing Societies' consensus document (2004):

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

by Aletha Tippett MD

The great medical pioneer, Dr. Paul Brand, was right when he said it's not about medicine, it's about mechanics. Think of the ulcers you are asked to see and treat. I hope the first question you ask about any wound is "how did this get here?" If the mechanics of a wound are not addressed, the medicine will not be successful.

Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

We've all experienced difficulty in getting dressings to stay on for as long as we need them to, especially when there are many commercial dressings that could (and should) remain in place for several days before they require changing.

The following are some materials that may prove helpful in keeping dressings in place:

Blog Category: 
Laurie Swezey's picture
Keywords: 

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Skin grafting of surgical wounds is performed for wounds that are difficult to close using traditional closure methods, such as staples or sutures. They may also be used for wounds that are expected to result in severe scarring, which may have psychological or physical repercussions for the patient. Skin grafting serves three main purposes: it covers the wound, minimizes scarring and speeds healing.