Wound Dressings

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

by Aletha Tippett MD

Once the individual has been thoroughly assessed for palliative care and his or her objectives and needs have been discussed, the wound care provider must determine the wound management strategy to follow. This strategy will depend upon the type of wound being treated for palliation. A summary of each type of wound and an appropriate palliative strategy are listed below, including factors such as removal of the wound cause, pain and drainage management, and odor control:

Beth Hawkins Bradley's picture
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by Beth Hawkins Bradley RN, MN, CWON

How often do you really consider the person that is attached to the wound you are treating? Do you take seriously those complaints, grunts, and grimaces that he sends your way when you remove drape and peel foam from a wound being treated with negative pressure? It isn’t pretty, but it is pretty important. I would love to hear what you think after you read and consider the content.

Sue Hull's picture

by Sue Hull MSN, RN, CWOCN

Here is an idea you will love!

What do you do with a blister? You know the problem. You discover a blister. If you don’t do anything, it will probably unroof and be open and vulnerable by the next time you see it.

If you put a transparent film on it, there will be a puddle of fluid in the dressing that will either leak or cause maceration and further skin breakdown.

What to do?

Sue Hull's picture

by Sue Hull MSN, RN, CWOCN

After I wrote the short series on wound care and wound product standardization, I received an email that said this:

"In your blog of June 3rd you've wrote that using dressing assortment supply from only one vendor brought significant economic benefits.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

by Aletha Tippett MD

Does wound care need to be expensive? In the U.S. over a billion dollars per year is spent on wound care. When dealing on an individual basis, the cost of treating a pressure ulcer, our most common type of wound, has been computed to be $1600/patient/month, adjusted for CPI.1 What is driving this trend? It is expensive, high tech equipment such as pressurized beds, vacuum assisted closure, surgical techniques for debridement and skin grafting, and high priced dressings such as some of the foams, alginates and collagen dressings. Additionally, costs are increased when care is ineffective or counter-productive, prolonging the need for care.