Wound Dressings

Karen Zulkowski's picture

by Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

As health care professionals we always want to heal our patients and make them better. This may not always be possible. We need to understand that not letting the pressure ulcer or wound we are treating get worse sometimes has to be the realistic goal.

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Michael Miller's picture

by Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 6

“IMPOSSIBLE, for a plain yellow pumpkin to become a golden carriage… But the world is full of zanies and fools, who don’t believe in sensible rules, and who won’t believe what sensible people say. And because these daft and dewy-eyed dopes keep building up impossible hopes, impossible, things are happening every day” (Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella).

Michael Miller's picture
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by Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 5

“Then if you got it, you don’t want it - seems to be the rule of thumb. Don’t be tricked by what you see, you got two ways to go.” Devo – Freedom of Choice

Kathi Thimsen's picture

by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Practicing skin and wound care requires the clinician to have many tools to address the myriad of issues related to patient management. Maintaining the integrity of a bandage, device, or skin edge all require operational understanding of the sticky aspect of wound care: adhesives.

Kathi Thimsen's picture
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by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Hydrogel dressings were one of the first wound care products to change the practice of drying out wounds using caustic agents. Hydrogels drove home the advanced theory of Dr. George D. Winter, referred to as “moist wound healing.” Winter was the scientist that identified and validated the theory that by providing a moist wound environment, the outcomes for patients were those of faster healing and stronger regenerated wounds tissue, with less scarring and pain.

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Michael Miller's picture

by Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 2

I recently recognized a puzzling aspect of my wound care practice; I am just not seeing that many infected wounds. Moreover, I seem to use much fewer antibiotics and antimicrobial agents than almost everybody else I know practicing in wound care.

Diane Krasner's picture
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From The Clinical Editor

by Diane Krasner PhD, RN, CWCN, CWS, MAPWCA, FAAN

Introduction

The push towards safety by regulators and payers reflects the evidence that safe healthcare practices have numerous benefits – from reducing sentinel events to improving quality outcomes and helping to avoid litigation (1, 2, 3, 4). The wound care community has been slow to adopt the safety mantra . . . but the time has come to put your “safety lenses” on and to view wound prevention and treatment as a safety issue.

Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

The sheer number of dressings available makes choosing the correct dressing for clients a difficult proposition. Clinicians today have a much wider variety of products to choose from, which can lead to confusion and, sometimes, the wrong type of dressing for a particular wound. Knowing the types of dressings available, their uses and when not to use a particular dressing may be one of the most difficult decisions in wound care management.

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Diane Krasner's picture

Reviewed by
Dr. Diane L. Krasner
PhD RN CWCN CWS MAPWCA FAAN

Originally published in World Wide Wounds (http://www.worldwidewounds.com/Common/Reviews.html). Used with permission.

Dr. Stephen Thomas has given a gift to the wound care community. This is a tome that every serious wound care clinician should have on his/her reference shelf.

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Laurie Swezey's picture
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by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Antimicrobial dressings have enjoyed a surge of popularity in recent years- there are now many dressing products on the market containing antimicrobials. However, just because they are available doesn’t mean they are the best choice for your patient. Let’s look at the use/purpose of these dressings, some of the types available and under what conditions they should and should not be used.

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