Wound Dressings

Laurie Swezey's picture
maceration of periwound skin

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

A wound that is too moist can be as detrimental to wound healing as a wound that is too dry. When a wound is too moist, the skin surrounding the wound, known as the periwound, can become macerated. Skin that is macerated is vulnerable to breakdown, leading to a possible increase in wound size.

Colton Mason's picture
healthcare caffeine

By Colton Mason

The next stop on our journey through "silicone valley" is with a company that is relatively new to the wound care scene. For years now, MediPurpose has been known as the manufacturer of SurgiLance safety lancets – one of the world's most popular single-use lancing devices. A few years ago, they entered the wound care market focusing on delivering low-cost options for products such as hydrocolloids and foam dressings. What peaked my interest though is their latest product innovation, a bordered foam dressing featuring a soft silicone adhesive.

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Colton Mason's picture

By Colton Mason

Medicare has recently made a significant change to several wound care dressings with honey-based components. The Medicare contractor (PDAC) which assigns reimbursement codes to wound care products made the decision to change HCPCS codes for honey-based dressings containing more than 50% medical honey to A9270. I have been working with a market leading brand in this product category, MediHoney® (Derma Sciences), to ensure everyone has the most up-to-date information regarding this recent Medicare Policy change. Here is the information that the manufacturer has compiled to help healthcare providers make educated decisions for prescribing honey-based dressings in lieu of the recent changes from Medicare:

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Tasneem Masqati and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

The majority of the wounds of the lower extremity are of arterial, venous or neurotrophic(diabetic) origin.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Bloodstop iX

By Emily Keeter and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

BloodSTOP iX is an absorbable, bioresorbable, lipophilic, animal-free hemostat, which resembles and is designed to handle like gauze. BloodSTOP iX is composed of etherized oxidized regenerated cellulose, which allows it to be 100% water-soluble with no animal-derived properties. BloodSTOP iX reduces bleeding time and accelerates blood coagulation by activating the intrinsic clotting pathway. Some of the benefits of BloodSTOP iX include its cost-effectiveness, ability to conform to different types of wounds, non-irritating woven matrix, and the reduction in hold times.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Evangelia Athanasoula and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

The sorbion sachet wound dressing, manufactured by sorbion GmbH & Co. in Germany and marketed in the US by Alliqua Biomedical, is a high capacity dressing that absorbs and holds wound exudate, removes some wound debris, draws in and holds wound bacteria helping to reduce surface bioburden, and maintains a balanced moist wound environment. The dressing uses what it calls "hydration response technology" to accomplish these goals.

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WoundSource Editors's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Writing up a case report is an important professional activity in not only wound care, but in any other field as well. A case report records the details of the presentation of signs and symptoms, assessment, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of a patient case or series of cases. Case reports typically describe an unusual presentation or complication relating to the patient's condition, or a new clinical approach to a common problem. The publication of a case report in a peer-reviewed journal, if that is your intent, is a great addition to your CV, especially if you are new to the profession.

Bruce Ruben's picture
Scab

By Bruce E. Ruben MD

In the beginning, long before Johnson met Johnson and Band-Aids were invented, primitive men and women suffered minor cuts and abrasions and probably left them uncovered to heal. After all, the bleeding had stopped, a scab eventually formed and experience had taught them that their skin would heal in a week or two. So there was no great rush to find a use for those puffy, cottony, soft, white plants growing in the fields just yet.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Chinenye Queen Ezike and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Venous Leg Ulcers (VLUs) are the most common cause of lower extremity ulcerations, affecting about 1% of the US population. Recurrence rates for VLUs are also extremely high and ulcers can remain for weeks to years, even with appropriate treatment. More often than not, however, they are treated with inadequate compression and are complicated by poor patient compliance.

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By Carmelita Harbeson and James McGuire DPM, PT, CPed, FAPWHc

Hemostasis, the resolution of bleeding, consists of several intricate and controlled steps: platelet activation, coagulation, and vascular repair. Whether bleeding is caused by surgery, trauma, or wound debridement, hemostatic control is something we face daily, and luckily there are many products available to assist in this process. This blog describes one tool in our arsenal, WoundSeal® MD, a hemostatic powder and wound sealant.

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