Wound Healing

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
wound care journal club

ByTemple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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Martin Vera's picture
barriers to wound healing

By Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

We hear this all too often, but it is so true: it takes a village to heal a wound. A village that's on the same page, with a thorough understanding of gaining progress and obtaining positive outcomes for the patient and removing the barriers to wound healing.

Jeffrey M. Levine's picture

By Jeffrey M. Levine MD, AGSF, CWS-P

You are looking at an amazing image of a dime-sized biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, grown and photographed by Scott Chimileski – a biologist, photographer, and writer at the Kolter Lab at Harvard Medical School.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
wound care journal club

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Martin Vera's picture
wound healing

By Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS

It is no surprise to coworkers, colleagues and even my patients that I am a huge advocate for education and of course, the building of a strong foundation. My personal experience has been that after I had built that strong foundation—as in, understanding the skin and cells involved in each layer, wound bed preparation framework and the phases of wound healing with the key cells involved in each phase—I became more efficient, provided better services and improved positive outcomes for my patients. And once the types of wounds came along, I felt prepared and ahead of the game to accept the challenges and complexities of each wound type, and educated myself to know the differences. As a clinician driven by a passion for healing patients, I can’t help but look for ways for me to improve and further educate myself, as well as bring others on board to join me and the thousands of clinicians out there gathered to fight for a good cause.

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
Nutrition and medicine

By Mary Ellen Posthauer, RDN, CD, LD, FAND

The World Union Wound Healing Society (WUWHS) held their 2016 meeting in historic Florence, Italy in September. The initial meeting of the WUWHS was held in Australia in 2000 and is convened every four years. I have had the unique opportunity to present in Paris, Toronto, Yokohama and this year in Florence on the topic of nutrition and wound healing. 4,226 clinicians attended the conference including 525 from the US. The convention center was a modern venue surrounded by the ancient walls of the Roman fortress.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
factors affecting healing in chronic wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

Whether due to injury or surgery, wound healing normally progresses steadily through an orderly set of stages. Wounds that don't heal within 30 days are considered chronic. Wounds that become chronic generally stall in one or more of the phases of wound healing. Here are 10 of the most common factors affecting wound healing in chronic wounds:

Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
chemical formula of arginine, an amino acid

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Clinicians continue to question if oral or tube feedings formulated with arginine hasten wound healing time versus standard high calorie, high protein supplements. There is an increase in the number of studies that examine the role of arginine in combination with other nutrients to facilitate pressure injury healing. Many of the studies were conducted in Europe or Australia using products that are not always marketed in the United States. However, very similar products are available.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
chicken egg use in wound healing

By Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
honey treatment and wounds

By Aletha Tippett MD

How often have you thought about using honey in a wound dressing? Never? In twenty years of wound care, honey was always something that could be used – sometimes by itself on a wound, or sometimes with other dressing material used on a wound.

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