Burns

Michel Hermans's picture
monitoring the healing time of partial-thickness burns

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

Recently I paid a visit to one of the better known wound care centers in the North East. As I expected, treatment of the common lesions seen in these centers, such as venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers, was top notch. The use of compression and offloading, proper wound debridement and modern dressings (including, where indicated, biologics and matrices), in combination with the option for vascular, plastic and orthopedic (i.e. for Charcot foot) reconstruction resulted in good healing results, with high percentages of reepithelialization within a relatively short time frame.

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Michel Hermans's picture

Part 1 in a series on clinical trials in wound care

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

To do a Randomized Controlled Trial within a reasonable time frame, the disease to be studied should be common and the patient population large and accessible. In addition, preferably the effect of the treatment should be fast and specific.

In the pharmaceutical environment these circumstances often exist. Nearly 68 million people in the US suffer from hypertension1,2 and it should be easy to find patients for a clinical trial. The study objective is also relatively simple: lowering blood pressure (of course I am simplifying here).

Bruce Ruben's picture

by Bruce E. Ruben MD

In order to understand the use of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) to heal burns, it is first important to understand the four burn classifications.

Classification of Burns

A first-degree or superficial burn affects only the epidermis or outer layer of skin. The burn site is red, painful, and dry with no blistering. A mild sunburn is one example of a first-degree burn. Long-term tissue damage is rare and usually consists of a lightening or a darkening in the skin color.

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Glenda Motta's picture

by Glenda Motta RN, MPH

Medicare contractors recently issued a reminder regarding the use of surgical dressings for Medicare beneficiaries. Apparently, not everyone realizes that not ALL wounds are eligible for surgical dressing reimbursement. So, here is a refresher course.

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Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Whirlpool therapy, or hydrotherapy, is one of the oldest adjuvant forms of treatment for wounds still in use today. It was originally used in pain management, but later found a use in wound management, particularly in the management of burn patients.

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Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

The sheer number of dressings available makes choosing the correct dressing for clients a difficult proposition. Clinicians today have a much wider variety of products to choose from, which can lead to confusion and, sometimes, the wrong type of dressing for a particular wound. Knowing the types of dressings available, their uses and when not to use a particular dressing may be one of the most difficult decisions in wound care management.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
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by the WoundSource Editors

Generally speaking, a burn is an injury to the tissue of the body, typically the skin. Burns can vary in severity from mild to life-threatening. Most burns only affect the uppermost layers of skin, but depending on the depth of the burn, underlying tissues can also be affected. Traditionally, burns are characterized by degree, with first being least severe and third being most. However, a more precise classification system referring to the thickness or depth of the wound is now more commonly used. For the sake of this article, burns will be described by thickness. For a comparison of the two classification systems, see the table below.

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Laurie Swezey's picture

by Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Health care professionals encounter burns in their patient populations frequently, and must be able to differentiate between types of burns, as well as know how to treat burn injuries using current practice standards. The following is an overview of first and second degree burns, including pathophysiology and treatment.

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