Wound Care

Hy-Tape International's picture
elderly patient skin tear prevention

by Hy-Tape International

Skin tears are a major and growing problem for health care professionals, particularly those caring for older patients. By 2060, the population of Americans age 65 or older is projected to grow from approximately 46 million to 98 million and account for 24% of the total population. This makes skin tears an issue of increasing concern, and it is important for those caring for older adults to take steps to prevent the problem.

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Industry News's picture

by The Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders

In their quarterly Alliance Advocacy Update, the Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders (Alliance) provides an update on their ongoing advocacy initiatives on behalf of their clinical association members to ensure access, coverage and payment to wound care procedures and technologies for patients and providers.

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Industry News's picture

by The Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders

October 4, 2017 - A new study published online in the International Society For Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research's (ISPOR) Value in Health journal demonstrates the economic impact of chronic nonhealing wounds in Medicare patients. The findings highlight the need for Federal research funding, quality measures and reimbursement models that are relevant to wound care. Such measures are not currently included under Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) payment policies, including the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA).

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Hy-Tape International's picture
preventative skin care - ostomy management

by Hy-Tape International

Prevention is one of the most important components of wound and ostomy care. Factors such as hydration, pressure, excessive moisture, cleanliness, and erythema can all affect wound healing rate, patient comfort, and the incidence of new wounds. By taking a proactive stance, health care professionals can reduce the risk of infection, reduce costs, and improve patient outcomes.

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Thomas Serena's picture
Wound Care Clinical Trials

By Thomas E. Serena MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

A recent article by Kaiser Health News misquoted me as saying that we enroll only "healthy" patients in our clinical trials. At moments like this, one feels that something has been overlooked. One of my research coordinators, recalling the serious adverse events (SAEs) of the previous week said, "The only patients sicker than ours are underground."

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Holly Hovan's picture
comparison

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, CWOCN-AP

As wound care clinicians, we are aware that part of the process of consulting requires a comprehensive wound assessment, looking at wound characteristics, causative factors, and drainage. As I've previously mentioned, we've all heard the term, "a dry cell is a dead cell." However, not all wounds are dry.

Janet Wolfson's picture
compression therapy for lymphedema

By Janet Wolfson PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

The intersection of wounds and lymphedema has been on my mind this week as challenging patients and a new reduction garment cross my dual specialty life.

Margaret Heale's picture
dressing removal

By Margaret Heale RN, MSc, CWOCN

Wounds are dressed every day, and much goes into the choices that are made to properly apply wound dressings. The condition of the periwound skin should be a major factor in the decisions made, as injuring this area can extend the wound and cause considerable pain. Tape removal is one of the most painful areas of wound care.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
wound care slide presentation

by Jeanne Cunningham, Founder of WoundSource

After seeing about 100 pictures of wounds, I was beginning to feel sick. The year was 1985 and there I was, a recent college graduate in my 20s, sitting in a cramped office at the Crozer Chester Medical Center in Chester, PA, watching slide after slide of feet, elbows, legs, bottoms, in fact, every part of the human body with open, colorful wounds.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
pressure-injuries

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Incorrect staging of pressure injuries can cause many types of repercussions. Incorrect documentation can also be worse than no documentation. Pressure injuries and staging mistakes are avoidable, so educating clinicians how to stage with confidence is the goal.