Debridement

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
wound debridement instruments

by The WoundSource Editors

There are five types of non-selective and selective debridement methods, but many factors determine what method will be most effective for your patient.1 Determining the debridement method is based not only on the wound presentation and evaluation, but also on the patient's history and physical examination. Looking at the "whole patient, not only the hole in the patient," is a valuable quote to live by as a wound care clinician. Ask yourself or your patient these few questions: Has the patient had a previous chronic wound history? Is your patient compliant with the plan of care? Who will be performing the dressing changes? Are there economic factors that affect the treatment plan? Take the answers to these questions into consideration when deciding on debridement methods.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Selecting a Debridement Method

by The WoundSource Editors

Debridement is essential to promote healing and prevent infection. There are five main types of debridement methods. BEAMS is the common acronym to remember all types: biological, enzymatic, autolytic, mechanical, and surgical. In recent years, new types of debridement technology have been introduced, such as fluid jet technology, ultrasound debridement therapy, hydrosurgery, and monofilament polyester fiber pad debridement.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

Calciphylaxis: A disorder, generally found in end stage renal disease, but not limited to renal patients, with widespread calcification of small and medium sized vessels, that leads to occlusion, thrombosis, and tissue necrosis. Extreme cases can be life-threatening.

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Industry News's picture

by Industry News

Schertz, TX – March 13, 2018 – EZ Debride, a registered and patent pending brand of MDM Wound Ventures LLC, developed and manufactured out of Schertz, Texas and Millersburg, Pennsylvania, is announcing the distribution agreement with BMK Ventures, Virginia Beach, Virginia.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Wound Care Journal Club Review

An important factor in wound healing is adequate blood flow; thus patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) and complex wounds are poor healers. Primary treatment for CLI is revascularization. Wound healing can be prolonged as a consequence of cyclical protease production by necrotic tissue during the inflammatory phase of healing. Debridement of necrotic tissue is therefore necessary to reduce inflammation and progress the healing cycle, as well as to promote epithelialization and reduce risk of infection. Conventional debridement therapy can be difficult in patients with CLI because of limitations in visualizing wound margins and time effectiveness. Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is a traditional debridement therapy using live, sterilized fly larvae. This study investigated MDT in patients with CLI after midfoot amputation following revascularization by endovascular therapy. The outcomes of wound bed preparation were compared with the outcomes in patients receiving conventional therapy.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
surgical instruments for debridement

by the WoundSource Editors

One of the greatest challenges when dealing with biofilms in chronic wounds is identifying their existence in the first place. The extracellular polymeric substance or EPS coating on biofilms essentially is an invisible cloak that protects and hides biofilms from both the body's immune system and antimicrobial therapies. This biofilm property keeps the wound from advancing through the phases of wound healing and thus remaining in the inflammatory phase, thereby allowing further proliferation of biofilms.

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Ron Sherman's picture
determining when to use contained maggot therapy

by Ronald Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H

In a previous post, we learned that all clinical studies to date and all but one laboratory study indicate that contained ("bagged") maggots are effective in wound debridement, but less so than "free-range" (or "non-bagged") larvae. Why, then, are they used? What are the attributes of contained maggots that make them worth sacrificing the efficacy and efficiency of conventional "free-range" maggots?

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Cheryl Carver's picture
wet-to-dry dressing changes using gauze

by Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

The big debate continues in regards to using wet-to-dry dressings. One thing that is for certain though is that this type of dressing is frowned upon in long-term care facilities per the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) Guidelines for pressure ulcers. However, long-term care facilities are put at risk for citations when using wet-to-dry dressings for any wound type.

Michel Hermans's picture
Year in review

by Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

At the beginning of a new year, many look back at the previous one in an attempt to analyze what happened, whether it was good or bad or perhaps even special.

From a chronic or acute wound healing point of view, 2015 was not particularly special. Yes, a number of new dressings and techniques were launched at the different conferences, but none of them really established a breakthrough with regard to new clinical data or a totally new approach to many of the still unsolved problems that exist in healing wounds.

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Ron Sherman's picture
Clinical Research

by Ron Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H

In my previous post on maggot therapy, we discussed the differences between confinement and containment maggot therapy dressings. This post will examine the studies that address differences in efficacy and efficiency between these two methods of maggot therapy. The majority of contained maggot studies use a specific brand of containment bag (Biobag™ or VitaPad™ by Biomonde) because those products – if not the very act of applying maggots to the wound within a bag – were patented 14 years ago by Wim Fleischmann.1

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