Pressure Ulcers

Heidi Cross's picture

By Heidi Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

Given the potential consequences of FTT, recognition and diagnosis of this phenomenon are important components of care in older adults. Regardless of status, health care providers should implement and document all appropriate measures within patient goals of care. One of the key factors in lawsuits is a lack of communication with family members, who maintain that they were not informed in a timely manner about their loved one’s health status and prognosis.

Heidi Cross's picture

By Heidi Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

The United States is one of the most litigious nations in the world, with the result that numerous medical malpractice lawsuits are initiated against hospitals and other health care facilities, as well as practitioners. Commonly, these lawsuits allege that the facility failed to meet standards of care related to management of wounds including pressure injuries, failed to provide adequate nutrition, and did not properly address issues such as incontinence.

Alex M. Aningalan's picture

Alex M. Aningalan, MSN, RN, CWON, WCC

Chronic wound conditions are prevalent across health care systems globally and often result in economic and humanistic burdens on clinicians and patients.1 Moreover, pressure injuries, among of the more common types of chronic wounds, affect an estimated 2.5 million people in the United States annually, resulting in a staggering 60,000 preventable deaths.2 In addition, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service reported that the United States spends about $9.1 to $11.6 billion annually as payment for the burden imposed by pressure injuries.2

Holly Hovan's picture

By Holly Hovan, MSN, GERO-BC, APRN, CWOCN-AP

Moisture-associated skin damage (MASD) is becoming increasingly prevalent in today’s health care system. Often associated with discomfort and pain, MASD ultimately negatively impacts quality of life. MASD is usually broken down into 3 or 4 categories, most commonly incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD), intertriginous dermatitis, periwound dermatitis, and peristomal dermatitis. In this blog, I focus on the prevention and treatment of IAD and subsequent pressure injuries in critical care through a nurse-led approach.

Heidi Cross's picture

I have been there, done that. Sitting in the fact witness chair in front of a plaintiff attorney who is wildly waving a copy of my facility’s wound care policy and procedure, demanding to know why certain things weren’t included in the policy, and why what was in the policy was not followed to the letter. Plaintiff attorneys have the right to demand copies of a facility’s policy and procedures as part of discovery and will go through them with a fine-tooth comb, compare what is in the policy with the care that was provided, and fault the facility for any deviations. It goes without saying that I promptly returned to my facility with a new understanding for how our policy was written and possible gaps and weaknesses.

Robin Lenz and Fahad Hussain's picture

By Dr. Lenz and Dr. Hussain

For the patient, the prevention of sores and injuries is better than treating them. Pressure-relieving mattresses may be essential for preventing pressure injuries (bed sores). These mattresses aid in relieving and redistributing pressure and can thereby cause a reduction of friction and shearing. Pressure-relieving mattresses provide support for the body and reduce the amount of force applied to a given area. Thus, for bedbound patients and patients who are unable to reposition themselves, these types of beds can be especially beneficial.

Robin Lenz and Fahad Hussain's picture

By Dr. Lenz and Dr. Hussain

Heel pressure injuries and various forms of ulcers are easy to identify, but are you overlooking sleeping position as a cause for wounds in other locations? Do you have a wound you are sure is venous but has normal venous insufficiency testing results and fails to respond to compression? Can pressure while sleeping slow or stop healing in your patients with venous and arterial wounds? Do you ask patients about their sleeping position in your history taking and physical examination? After reading this article, you will be able to ask patients about their sleeping habits and heal more wounds with that knowledge

Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Medical device–related pressure injuries (MDRPIs) are recognized as a significant problem, evidenced by the inclusion in the National Pressure Injury Advisory Panel pressure injury definitions and described by Pitman and Gillespie in 2020.1 Prevention of medical device-related pressure injuries is a goal that may be achieved through meticulous patient care.

Holly Hovan's picture

By Holly Hovan, MSN, GERO-BC, APRN, CWOCN-AP

Pressure injuries (PIs) typically are the result of unrelieved pressure, shear, or force. In an inpatient or hospital setting, interventions are put into place to prevent pressure injuries based on evidence and patient risk. However, PIs still develop in some patients despite interventions. Experts agree that most PIs are in fact avoidable; however, some patients may experience unavoidable skin breakdown at end of life (EoL).¹ Kennedy terminal ulcers (KTUs), skin changes at life’s end (SCALE), and Trombley-Brennan terminal tissue injuries (TB-TTIs) are some of the common terms used to describe unavoidable skin changes at EoL.¹

Heidi Cross's picture

By Heidi Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

As detailed in my last few blogs, nutrition plays a huge role in risk for skin breakdown as well as healing of wounds. Just about ALL wound litigation involves nutrition in one way or another, be it diabetes control (or lack thereof) or weight loss, which occurs often in patients with dementia and toward end of life, or general malnutrition.