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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Pressure Ulcer Prevention

by Aletha Tippett MD

How do you prevent pressure ulcers? This is an interesting question and one that eludes many. Currently, I am involved in reviewing research proposals to prevent pressure ulcers (injuries). The funny thing is that there is nothing new. Everyone is using the same known techniques, just trying different forms. However, there is a proven way to prevent pressure ulcers and it was done years ago in a Cincinnati nursing home I was working in without any fanfare. The results from this nursing home wound care program were even published.1

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Catherine Milne's picture
The Future of Wound Care

by Catherine Milne, APRN, MSN, ANP/ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

Imagine yourself soaking up the sun on a tropical island. A subtle breeze from the swaying palm trees keeps you at the perfect temperature. In one hand you are holding a brightly colored drink with its obligatory umbrella garnish. The drink is non-alcoholic, of course, because you are working. In the other hand is a device that is monitoring your patient’s open wound and alerting you to changes in wound bed characteristics that must be acted on. You push a button to modulate the wound environment and return to the sounds of the crystal clear blue water lapping at your feet. Sounds nice, right?

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Cheryl Carver's picture
Combat Medicine

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, DAPWCA, FACCWS, CLTC – Wound Educator

As a veteran of the U.S. Army, and having a grandfather who was a U.S. Army combat medic, I have always had an interest in combat wound care.

Wound care has evolved immensely throughout the years in the military arena. The treatments used as far back as the fifth century B.C. were inconceivable. Examples are keeping wounds dry, wound irrigation with water and wine, burning oil into infected wounds, and topicals such as egg yolks, rose oil, and turpentine applied to the wound bed. Odor was controlled with bags of lavender at the soldier’s bedside.

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Nancy Munoz's picture
Nutrition Management

by Dr. Nancy Munoz, DCN, MHA, RDN, FAND

The presence of diabetes can contribute to a decreased wound healing rate. Increased glucose levels can stiffen the arteries and contribute to narrowing of the blood vessels. This can contribute to pressure injury development and is a risk factor for impaired wound healing.

Diabetes is an illness in which the individual’s blood glucose level is above the established range. Glucose is present in the foods we eat. Most foods contain a blend of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. The amount of each of these nutrients in the foods we consume determines how quickly the body transforms food into glucose. For instance, consuming carbohydrates affects blood glucose levels one to two hours after the meal. Ingesting protein has very little influence on blood glucose levels, and the glucose from the fat in foods is slowly absorbed and does not contribute to increase glucose levels.

Marta Ostler's picture
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Wound Dressing Selection Facts and Questions

By Marta Ostler, PT, CWS, CLT, DAPWCA

On June 28, 2018, I presented a webinar on the topic of wound dressing selection as part of WoundSource's Practice Accelerator series on Wound Dressings 101. Choosing an appropriate wound dressing for your patient can be a difficult task; however, understanding this important step in the wound healing cascade is integral to maintaining and achieving healing outcomes for our patients with chronic and acute wounds.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
Burn Treatment

by the WoundSource Editors

As the fourth of July rolls around, hospitals and clinics all over the country will begin to see an increase in burn incidents. According to the Consumer Product Safety Committee, 68% of the estimated total fireworks-related injuries in 2016 happened between June 18 and July 18.1 From simple blisters obtained by holding a sparkler too close, to third-degree, full-thickness burns obtained from a stray firework, it is important that health care providers know how to effectively manage burn injuries.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Wound Tissue

by the WoundSource Editors

Successful utilization of the TIME model for wound bed preparation requires a working knowledge of chronic wound tissue types. In addition, building on this foundational knowledge is the development of accurate wound assessment skills. These components combined will assist the clinician in implementing the appropriate interventions for each wound.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Moisture Management

by the WoundSource Editors

Before embarking on the journey of wound bed preparation, the goals for wound care should be carefully considered. A realistic look at the goals and expectations from the perspective of the patient as well as the wound care team is the first step in developing and implementing the appropriate plan of care.

Is the wound healable? This requires that the individual's body can support the phases of wound healing in an expected time frame. Treatment should be aggressive to prevent any delay in the healing process that would stall wound healing or lead the wound to become chronic. Is maintenance the goal? If so, then efforts should focus on keeping the wound from deteriorating by providing comprehensive wound care. Is hospice or palliative care the goal? If the wound is not expected to heal and the individual's body cannot support the phases of wound healing within an expected time frame, then comfort measures are more important than a cure. All parties should be on the same page with goals and objectives so they are working in tandem toward the best outcome for the individual patient.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Edge Management

by the WoundSource Editors

For wound healing to occur, a complex, well-defined cascade of events must take place in the body’s natural host processes. When this cascade of events is disturbed, a wound can fall into a state of non-healing or chronicity. In clinical practice, chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers, vascular ulcers, and neuropathic wounds behave differently and may be extremely slow to heal. A chronic wound, by definition, is a wound that has failed to progress through the “normal” healing process or is not responsive to management in a timely manner.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Bioburden in wounds

by the WoundSource Editors

Bioburden in chronic wounds can be a principal contributor to inflammation, clinical wound infection, and further delayed wound healing. Clinically diagnosing infection in chronic wounds can be problematic because most individuals susceptible to developing chronic wounds are subject to physiological states that often blunt typical infectious responses in various ways. These responses include pain, erythema, febrile state, leukocytosis, edema and increased wound exudate, wound odor, etc.

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