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Holly Hovan's picture
Ostomy Certification

By Holly M. Hovan, MSN, RN-BC, APRN, CWOCN-AP

As someone who holds tricertification, I often feel as though my ostomy patients are the ones in whose lives I am making the biggest difference. Watching them progress, gain confidence in independent ostomy management, and enjoy their lives once again is one of the best feelings to me!

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Biofilm

By the WoundSource Editors

Biofilm: this term is frequently used in the wound care space, but biofilm continues to be largely undertreated in wound care. What do the bedside nurse or clinician need to know about biofilm? Should clinicians care less about biofilm on a maintenance or palliative wound versus a wound they are actively trying to heal? Let's address these questions and get to the root of the biofilm in managing complex wound cases.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Article Title: Graduating Student Nurses' and Student Podiatrists' Wound Care Competence: A Cross-Sectional Study
Authors: Kielo E, Salminen L, Suhonen R, Puukka P, Stolt M
Journal: J Wound Care. 2019;28(3):136-145
Reviewed by: Stephanie Golding, class of 2020, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Kathy Gallagher's picture
Acute Surgical Wound Service

By Kathy Gallagher, DNP, APRN-FNP, CMC, UMC, BC, WCC, CWS, FACCWS

In 2010, Christiana Care Health System, a 1,000 bed Level I trauma center in Wilmington, Delaware, introduced an acute surgical wound service (ASWS) integration plan in with a single dedicated nurse practitioner, trauma surgeon, and administrative leader. Subsequently, trauma patients with complex wounds experienced decreased morbidity and length of stay. Closely aligned with these numbers, their patient days of negative pressure wound therapy fell from 11+ days in 2010 to 8.2 days in 2018, representing one of the lowest in the nation.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Factors Contributing to Complex Wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

A vast percentage of wounds become chronically stalled because of mixed etiology and other underlying comorbid medical conditions. This means the wound is multifactorial, and using a singular approach won’t be enough. Lower extremity wounds, for example, can have diabetes, venous and arterial issues, and pressure all as factors playing into the same wound.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Wound Infection

By the WoundSource Editors

Although complex wounds typically present with clinical challenges in treatment, there are certain types of wounds that clinicians are used to facing: pressure wounds , arterial wounds, venous wounds, diabetic wounds, moisture-related wounds, end-of-life wounds, dehisced or complicated surgical wounds, and wounds of mixed etiology. However, the uncommon complex wounds are the ones often misdiagnosed or misidentified because of a lack of understanding or even ability to have them diagnosed properly. Often the rare or unusual skin lesions or ulcers require advanced diagnostic capabilities, such as the ability to perform a biopsy, tissue culture, radiological study, or other examination. So how do you know that what you’re treating is what you think you’re treating?

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Complex Wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

Complex wounds pose a significant challenge for many health care providers. These wounds are often multifaceted, making treatment tremendously difficult. They represent a substantial burden on the health care industry, with annual costs in North America alone estimated at $10 billion annually. They often also result in patient discomfort and pain, caregiver frustration, individual economic losses, and diminished quality of life.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Article Title: Pressure Injury Progression and Factors Associated With Different End-Points in a Home Palliative Care Setting: A Retrospective Chart Review Study
Authors: Artico M, D’Angelo D, Piredda M, et al
Journal: J Pain Symptom Manage 2018;56(1):23-31
Reviewed by: Arden Harada, class of 2021, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

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Fabiola Jimenez's picture
Skin Care

By Fabiola Jimenez, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

Have you noticed the tissue trauma that occurs to the posterior aspect of the scrotum? It appears like road rash, partial tissue loss, and denudation. Many times it is weepy, and looks it appears quite painful to the patient.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Velcro devices for Venous Ulcers

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Article Title: Review of Adjustable Velcro Wrap Devices for Venous Ulceration
Authors: Stather PW, Petty C, Howar AQ
Journal: Int Wound J. 2019 Mar 21 [Epub ahead of print].
Reviewed by: Olivia Hammond, class of 2020, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine