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Becky Naughton's picture
Weird Wounds

By Becky Naughton, RN, MSN, FNP-C, WCC

When I was in my APRN program, a phrase that I heard from an instructor has stuck with me throughout my practice: "When it comes to diagnosing, if you hear hooves, think horses, not zebras." Essentially, think of the obvious or likely reason first before jumping to a more obscure diagnosis. In the large majority of cases, the more common ailment is likely the cause. But what happens if the symptoms just don't quite add up?

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
The Inflammatory Phase of Wound Healing

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound healing is a complex biological process that involves a sequence of molecular and cellular events to restore damaged tissue. These events occur within the extracellular matrix, a complex three-dimensional acellular environment that is present within all tissue and essential for life. Remodeling within this extracellular matrix is necessary for tissue repair throughout the wound healing process, including during the inflammatory phase.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Wound Reepithelialization

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound reepithelialization is key in the goal of wound closure. Reepithelialization is a coordinated multifactorial systemic process that involves formation of new epithelium and skin appendages. The epithelialization process can be stalled by a number of factors, all of which must be resolved before wound healing can move forward.

WoundSource Editors's picture
Keywords: 
Burns

Burns occur when the skin comes into contact with a heat source or caustic substance, commonly fire or flames, boiling liquid, hot objects, electrical current, or chemical agents. Different mechanisms of injury that can cause a burn include scalding, fire, chemical exposure, electrical exposure, and radiation. The extent of injuries that can occur from a burn is highly variable, and morbidity and mortality tend to increase as the surface area of the burn increases. Proper classification of burns is essential in guiding the initial management of the burn wound and achieving optimal outcomes.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Preventing Wound Chronicity

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound chronicity is defined as any wound that is physiologically impaired due to a disruption in the wound healing cascade: 1) hemostasis, 2) inflammation, 3) proliferation, and 4) maturation/remodeling. To effectively manage chronic wounds, we must understand the normal healing process and wound bed preparation (WBP). Wound chronicity can occur due to impaired angiogenesis, innervation, or cellular migration. The presence of biofilm and infection are the most common causes of delayed healing.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
The Role of Collagen

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound chronicity is an ongoing challenge for patients and health care professionals around the globe. An astonishing 4.5 million people in the United States experience lower extremity wound chronicity, while an estimated 1% are affected in the Western population with all types of chronic wounds. The cascade of wound healing does not always follow suit in an orderly fashion of hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling.

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Margaret Heale's picture
Patient Education and Wound Cleansing

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

As patient-driven groupings model hits home care, patients or their caregivers will be expected to do more of the care. Subsequently, nursing staff are expected to provide more education, making "how to" information more crucial than ever.

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M. Mark Melin's picture
Phlebolymphedema

M. Mark Melin, MD, FACS, RPVI, FACCWS

Understanding that February is venous leg ulcer (VLU) month, we would be remiss to exclude a consideration of the critically important role played by the lymphatic system. As such, I want to highlight the work of Dr. Tom O'Donnell in a recent editorial written on this subject.

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Becky Naughton's picture
platelet-rich plasma

Becky Naughton, RN, MSN, FNP-C, WCC

What if I told you that there is a substance that we can isolate from your own blood that can help to heal the most difficult wound? I envision a scene out of "Star Trek" where Bones does a quick scan of his patient, draws some blood, runs it through some machines, and then out pops a seemingly magical elixir. He studies this new yellow substance and then injects it back into his patient (with a quick and seemingly painless puff from his high-tech injector gun).

WoundSource Editors's picture
Necrotic Wounds

By the WoundSource Editors

Necrotic wounds are characterized by devitalized, or dead, tissue. Necrosis may be caused by malignancy, infection, trauma, ischemia, inflammation, or exposure to toxins. It may also be caused by improper care of an existing wound site. Devitalized tissue has no blood supply, and its presence prevents wound healing. It is necessary for necrotic tissue to be removed to allow wound healing to occur.