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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Surgical Wound Infection Assessment

By the WoundSource Editors

With an associated cost of $3.5 billion to $10 billion spent annually on surgical site infections (SSIs) and complications in the United States, it is important to know how to assess for surgical wound complications. There is a difference between the normal cascade response and a brewing infection. Symptoms of infection are often the first clue that there is more occurring in the wound than meets the eye.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Mesenchymal stem cells to heal diabetic foot ulcers

By Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Article Title: Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcer
Authors: Cao Y, Gang X, Wang G
Journal: J Diabetes Res. 2017;2017:9328347.
Reviewed by: Sai Vemula, class of 2020, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

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Janet Wolfson's picture
Frequently Asked Questions

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Reflecting back on "In the Trenches With Lymphedema," WoundSource's June Practice Accelerator webinar, many people sent in questions. I have addressed some regarding compression use here.

Alton R. Johnson Jr.'s picture
Compression therapy for wound management

By Alton R. Johnson Jr, DPM

Four weeks ago, I was granted the privilege to treat a patient with type 2 diabetes with neuropathy who presented to the wound care center after developing a full-thickness pressure ulceration on the lateral aspect of her right leg as a result of an ill-fitted brace used four weeks earlier. The first clinical feature I noticed about the patient's lower extremity compared with the previous encounter was marked increased pitting edema. As a sequela of the lack of compression, the patient's lower extremity edema had increased, causing the wound to break down further in comparison with our last encounter with her. I first asked the patient why she discontinued the multipurpose tubular bandage that was dispensed and applied to her right extremity during the last visit. Her immediate response was that the home health aide had disposed of it by mistake; however, the patient stated that the aide used an available non-compressive stockinette instead.

WoundSource Editors's picture
Risk Assessment Standardization

By the WoundSource Editors

The prevalence of pressure injuries among certain high-risk patient populations has made pressure injury risk assessment a standard of care. When utilized on a regular basis, standardized assessment tools, along with consistent documentation, increase accuracy of pressure injury risk assessment, subsequently improving patient outcomes. Conversely, inconsistent and non-standardized assessment and poor documentation can contribute to negative patient outcomes, denial of reimbursement, and possibly wound-related litigation.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Delayed healing in diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is the result of the polymicrobial structures of DFUs and the buildup of biofilms. Wound debridement is an essential part of wound bed preparation (WBP) that helps to remove bacteria and allow the body to continue the healing process. Although sharp debridement is the most common technique used for DFUs, it has many limitations, including contraindications in patients with poor vascular status, the need for an operating room, and the requirement for specific surgeon skills. There is also the potential for extensive damage to the wound bed with exposed bone because of obstruction of the view from biofilm formation. The use of an ultrasound-assisted wound (UAW) debridement device aims to disrupt the formation of biofilms and stimulate wound granulation, thus allowing for the wound to have a healthy environment in which to heal. This study evaluated the clinical and microbiological impact of using UAW debridement devices in individuals with neuroischemic DFUs.

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Susan Cleveland's picture
Skin Assessment Interview

By Susan M. Cleveland, BSN, RN, WCC, CDP, NADONA Board Secretary

As a Director of Nursing, your assessment skills must be tiptop. How are the skills of the staff you are entrusting with the care of our older residents in long-term care? Have you given the staff the tools and time required to accomplish comprehensive and compassionate assessments?

Holly Hovan's picture
Professional Development

By Holly M. Hovan, MSN, RN-BC, APRN-CNS, CWOCN-AP

As wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC) nurses, and nurses in general, we are often so busy taking care of others that sometimes we forget to take care of ourselves. A wise instructor in nursing school once told me, "If you don't take care of yourself first, you won't be able to take care of anyone else." I am often reminded of this when I travel and the flight attendant says "Please secure your own mask first!" Hearing that simple reminder will always and forever remind me to take care of myself first to best take care of others.

Margaret Heale's picture
Continence Assessment

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Not very long ago, when working in an in-patient rehab center, I was shocked to discover patients calling the adult incontinence garments "hospital underwear." We were making good inroads into reducing the use of these products with the hope that if we used less it would be possible to acquire higher-quality products that would function optimally for patients who really needed them. It was of concern that some facilities had become diaper-free because many of our patients benefited from briefs, particularly as a "just in case security blanket" and we felt it was unrealistic for our patient population to be brief-free.

Hy-Tape International's picture
Management Strategies for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

By Hy-Tape International

According to a published study, the global prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is 6.3%, with male patients and older adults being the most likely to be affected.1 This prevalence, coupled with the potential for complications and the severe effect on quality of life the condition can have, makes DFUs one of today's most serious health care issues. To reduce the effects of DFUs and improve outcomes for patients, it is critical that health care professionals rapidly identify DFUs and implement best practice dressing and management strategies.