Blog logo

Blogs

Bloggers

Blog Categories

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Compression

By the WoundSource Editors

Lymphedema is edema—swelling of tissues caused by fluid in the intracellular space—that is caused by dysfunction or disruption of the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system uses lymphatic vessels to absorb, transfer, and filter fluids from peripheral intracellular spaces and return these fluids to general circulation. When there is an obstruction or a structural change to the lymphatic system, typically experienced in response to surgical or neoplastic changes, the transfer of extracellular fluids from the periphery is inhibited, resulting in localized edema distal to the site of the structural deficiency.

Blog Category: 
WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Lymphatic System

By the WoundSource Editors

The lymphatic system is an incredibly complex network of tissues and organs. Together, this network regulates fluid balance, transports fatty acids from the gastrointestinal tract, and contributes to the immune system. Dysfunction in the lymphatic system can lead to lymphedema and tumor development. Although it is common to treat wounds and lymphatic dysfunction as separate conditions, there can be many benefits in viewing these conditions as interrelated.

Blog Category: 
Holly Hovan's picture
Wound Care Certification

By Holly Hovan MSN, RN-BC, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

As discussed in a prior blog, reflecting on why you want to become certified and how to begin the process are some important initial steps when considering certification. Understanding certification, how it relates to or potentially changes your current position and employer recognition are some important initial considerations as well. Certification is a mark of professionalism and a designation as an expert in your field of practice. After deciding on a certifying body that aligns with your goals and values, and those of your employer, the next step is to prepare for the exam.

Blog Category: 
WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Cellulitis: A common bacterial skin infection that appears as a swollen, red area of skin that feels hot and tender; also known as lymphangitis. Treatment should begin promptly to avoid having the infection spread rapidly and become life-threatening.

Complete decongestive therapy (CDT): The system of lymphedema treatment that includes manual lymph drainage (MLD), compression techniques, decongestive exercise, and self-care training.

Congenital lymphedema: A form of primary lymphedema that is present from birth; also known as Milroy's disease or Nonne-Milroy disease.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Article Title: Stability, Activity, and Application of Topical Doxycycline Formulations in a Diabetic Wound Case Study
Authors: Gabriele, S; Buchanan, B; Kundu, A; Dwyer, HC; Gabriele, JP; Mayer, P; Baranowski, DC
Journal: Wounds. 2019;31(2):49-54
Reviewed by: Garrett Biela, Class of 2020, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Blog Category: 
Heidi Cross's picture
Keywords: 
Chronic Wounds

By Heidi Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

In my recent WoundSource webinar, I discussed the topic of chronic wound etiology and management. The webinar is still available for viewing on WoundSource.com. Chronic wounds are vexing and frustrating to manage; they can be expensive and are a huge source of morbidity and mortality. Infection prevention is a key part of chronic wound management, with recognition of the role that biofilms play.

Blog Category: 
Heidi Cross's picture
Unavoidable Pressure Ulcers

By Heidi Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

"At all times material hereto, defendant failed to develop an adequate care plan and properly monitor and supervise the care and treatment in order to prevent her from suffering the development and deterioration of bed sores."

Cathy Wogamon's picture
Osteomyelitis

By Cathy Wogamon, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, CWON, CFCN

Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone that usually requires surgical intervention. What about the patient who presents with comorbidities that prevent the patient from having surgical intervention? Studies conducted in diabetic foot ulcers have indicated that patients can receive adequate healing of osteomyelitis with antibiotic therapy as opposed to surgical intervention.

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

Article Title: IL-7 Over-expression Enhances Therapeutic Potential of Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Diabetic Wounds
Authors: Khalid, R. S., Khan, I., Zaidi, M. B., Naeem, N., Haneef, K., Qazi, R., Habib, R., Malick, T. S., Ali, A. and Salim, A.
Journal: Wound Rep Reg
Reviewed by: Zoha Khan, Class of 2020, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Blog Category: 
Christine Miller's picture
Patient Noncompliance

Christine Miller, DPM, DMM, PhD, FACCWS

One of the most difficult aspects of patient care is dealing with non-compliance. How do we help those who refuse to help themselves? This question is very convoluted indeed! The best treatment protocols in the world will be unsuccessful if the patient does not follow the recommendations. Patients with chronic wounds are usually those with multiple comorbidities such as uncontrolled diabetes, autoimmune disease, and uncontrolled hypertension. This complex medical picture is challenging enough for all of us trying to heal them, but add the patients' lack of concern for their own health and it is quite frankly maddening. I find myself often saying, "Help me help you" or "Healing is a team event," although mostly my genuine pleas for partnership fall on deaf ears.

Blog Category: