Blog logo

Blogs

Holly Hovan's picture
Geriatric Skin

by Holly M. Hovan, MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

With a growing population of Americans aged 65 or older, it is important to know what skin changes are normal and abnormal and what we can do in terms of treatment, education, and prevention of skin injuries.

Blog Category: 
Janet Wolfson's picture
Patient-Centered Communication

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

Last spring, I encountered that specific type of patient we sometimes meet, the one who has been through the chronic wound care revolving door so many times that he or she sets out on his or her own path and refuses any byways diverting from it.

Blog Category: 
WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

Callus: Localized area where the stratum corneum is thickened, typically found bordering ulcerations on the plantar, medial, and lateral surfaces of the foot; in the setting of diabetic foot ulcer, this indicates an area of repetitive external pressure or trauma.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Diabetic Foot Ulcer Prevention

by the WoundSource Editors

Comprehensive treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) includes moist local or topical wound care, serial sharp debridement, treatment of infection, mechanical offloading, glycemic control, nutritional management, and overall chronic disease management. These facets of therapy are best addressed by an interdisciplinary approach.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Wound Assessment

by the WoundSource Editors

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are ostensibly the most challenging types of chronic ulcerations to manage, given their multifactorial nature. Thorough, systematic assessment of a patient with a DFU is essential to developing a comprehensive plan of care. To implement the treatment plan successfully, clinicians and patients must work together to address each factor contributing to ulcer development and perpetuation.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

Overview

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are arguably among the most difficult types of wounds to manage; the etiology of these wounds poses some of the greatest clinical challenges for healing, considering the multifaceted nature of diabetes mellitus (DM). Multiple patient-related factors must be addressed and controlled through faithful adherence to the prescribed plan of care, which is developed by both the patient and clinicians to ensure success.

Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, DAPWCA, FACCWS, CLTC – Wound Educator

Blog Category: