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Heidi Cross's picture

By Heidi Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

Pressure injury risk and development are multifactorial, individualized processes. Each patient presents with a unique set of circumstances and needs. In looking at charts for attorneys to determine whether standards of care related to pressure injuries have been met, key elements include turning and positioning measures, support surfaces, mobility, proper and timely assessment of risk factors and wounds, physician communication and notifications, communication with family, proper wound treatments, and nutrition assessment and measures.

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Holly Hovan's picture

Holly M. Hovan MSN, RN-BC, APRN, CWOCN-AP

An abdominoperineal resection (APR) is an operation in which a surgeon removes the anus, rectum, and sigmoid colon, usually to treat low rectal cancers.

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Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, DAPWCA, FACCWS

I am into my 20th year working as a wound care specialist. I must admit, I never thought much about wound management in the prison population until my son's wound care experiences during his incarcerations. I am quite transparent with this blog, and after you finish reading it, I hope you will have a different perspective on wound care in prison populations. I want to point out that this was my son's experience, which he encouraged me to share to help others. This blog is my view and does not define correctional nurses or wound care management in all prisons. I have the utmost respect for correctional nurses because I know that I could not do it. Through my son's experience, I identified various gaps in education and factors affecting quality of wound care that led to my interest in researching this area of wound care.

WoundSource Editors's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Studies have shown significant value in moist wound healing as opposed to treatment of wounds in a dry environment, and clinical evidence has supported this view for many years. Moist wound healing has been shown to promote re-epithelialization and can result in a reduction of scar formation because a moist environment keeps new skin cells alive and promotes cell regrowth. Treatment of wounds in a moist environment additionally shows promise for the creation of a microenvironment conducive to regenerative healing without scar formation. For these reasons, clinicians often select dressings that will create and manage a moist wound environment.

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Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Nurses week, which took place in May, may have fallen a little flat this year, as employers were not able to gather staff and celebrate as they might otherwise have done, but the caring continues. As a group, we have been recognized as essential. In managing wounds, nurses play a vital role in supporting patients' progress toward healing, as well as prevention. It is likely our recognition will last a while, as generally nurses come out on top in polls that ask which profession is the most trusted and caring. Unfortunately, our assistant colleagues, who care just as much, don't do so well when it comes to their pay packet.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
Dehiscence

By the WoundSource Editors

Dehiscence occurs when a surgical incision that was closed opens, either partially or completely. Dehiscence is most likely to take place within the first two weeks after surgery, but it can occur as late as one month after surgery.

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Lauren Lazarevski's picture
mucosal pressure injuries

By Lauren Lazarevski RN, BSN, CWOCN

As I contemplate the current conversation around ventilators, I am encouraged to refresh my knowledge about mucosal pressure injuries. Pressure injuries on the mucous membranes present and are staged differently from cutaneous pressure ulcers, and they are usually attributed to a medical device or tube. Nasogastric or orogastric tubes, oxygen cannulas or masks, endotracheal tubes, and urinary and fecal containment devices pose a risk of causing local ischemia to tissue in the nose, mouth, genitals, or rectum, respectively. Once a mucosal injury occurs, the patient is at increased risk of other problems, including pain, infection (especially if injury occurs to the urinary tract), and even malnutrition, if pain from oral wounds makes it difficult to eat and drink. These hospital-acquired pressure injuries contribute to the physical burden on the patient, as well as the financial burden on the hospital because they do count as a nosocomial—and usually, preventable—ulcer.

WoundSource Editors's picture
Antifungal Cream

By the WoundSource Editors

Antifungal cream is a broad term used to describe a range of products containing antifungal agents that are topically applied to the skin to control and manage fungal infections. These products may be formulated with a moisture barrier to protect and condition the skin. Antifungal creams are used both as a palliative treatment for existing fungal infections and as a prophylactic measure in cases where there is a risk of fungal infection.

Christine Miller's picture
Wound Healing During COVID

By Christine Miller DPM, PhD

It is an understatement to say that these are trying and uncertain times, as we ride this unpredictable wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. All of us in wound healing as part of the greater health care force are deemed essential, so we cannot "shelter in place." As health care workers, we have to balance our duty to render care with that of protecting ourselves, a tricky tightrope balancing act. The media coverage of this pandemic is constant and anxiety producing, but it has made me ponder the term essential and what that truly means to our patients.

WoundSource Editors's picture
Maceration

By the WoundSource Editors

Maceration occurs when skin has been exposed to moisture for too long. A telltale sign of maceration is skin that looks soggy, feels soft, or appears whiter than usual. There may be a white ring around the wound in wounds that are too moist or have exposure to too much drainage.