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Ivy Razmus's picture
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By Ivy Razmus, RN, PhD, CWOCN

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has left many people with free time on their hands as other activities are cut to avoid exposure to the virus. What if we used this time during the pandemic to strengthen screening for cancers? When later-stage cancers are discovered, patients often undergo surgery with open wounds, new stomas, and other risk factors for infection. These wounds may require wound vacuum devices, complex dressing changes, increased nursing time, and in some cases an increased length of hospital stay. After discharge, these patients often require care in a skilled nursing facility to help them transition to home care. Can we prevent ostomies and wounds by making screening more accessible? Further, the diagnosis of cancer can lead to hospitalization and an increased need for adjuvant therapy such as chemotherapy or radiation, which weakens the immune system.

Cathy Wogamon's picture

By Cathy Wogamon, DPN, MSN, FNP-BC, CWON

Communication issues have arisen in the wound care world while providing care during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Many of our older adult patients may already have hearing issues and rely on reading lips, which is impossible with the recent advent of masking and face shields. In addition to the masks, it is often difficult for patients to differentiate who is who when we are all in full protective gear. How can we make communicating with our patients less difficult during these trying times? Here are a few suggestions:

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture

By Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Chronic diabetic foot ulcers affect approximately 13% of the United States population. Chronic diabetic foot ulcers, or DFU, are defined by the authors as, “nonhealing ulcers of the foot lasting more than 3 months’ duration in patients with diabetes”. It is critical to treat DFUs effectively and timely, as ulcers may progress to the point of requiring an amputation. Patients suffering from a DFU may have an amputation rate of 21.5% to 28.4%.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Surgical Site Management

Surgical site management in the post-operative time frame is paramount in preventing infection and wound dehiscence. It is essential to use practical knowledge in good wound cleansing and skin care and in providing moisture balance in surgical site wound care management.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
bioburden management

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a risk for the more than 10 million patients who undergo inpatient surgical procedures every year in the United States. Between 300,000 and 500,000 Americans develop SSIs annually. SSIs are defined as infections related to an operative procedure that occur at or near the surgical incision within 30 days of the procedure, or within 90 days if prosthetic material is implanted.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Aseptic: Aseptic surgical procedures are those that aim at eliminating the risk of transmission of all harmful microorganisms. Aseptic practices can prevent the cross-contamination of pathogens.

Bioburden: The number of microorganisms within a wound is referred to as bioburden. Bioburden management is crucial in post-operative care to prevent infection.

Cellular/tissue-based products: These are products, commonly derived from cadavers or other human and other animal cells, that can aid in closing dehisced surgical wounds by providing a substitute for the skin to act as a barrier while healing.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Preventing Cross-Contamination

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are wound infections that occur after invasive surgical procedures. Depending on the location of the wound and the level of post-operative care that the patient receives, the risk of developing an SSI can be as high as 20%,1 although across all patients undergoing inpatient procedures in the United States, the rate of SSI occurrence is between 2% and 4%.2

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Preventing Post-Operative Complications

Surgical complications impact many patients every year, and when post-operative complications occur, they can disrupt the normal healing cycle and introduce new challenges in patient care. It is estimated that between 3% and 27% of surgical patients have unforeseen complications related to their surgical event.1

WoundCon Faculty's picture

By: Marta Ostler, PT, CWS, CLT, DAPWCA, and Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

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Heidi Cross's picture
Nutrition Management

By Heidi Cross, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWON

"Defendants failed to provide adequate nutrition to prevent plaintiff from suffering severe malnutrition and weight loss. This allowed the development of a severe pressure ulcer, numerous infections, and dehydration and malnutrition. Had defendants provided proper care, the pressure ulcer, infections, and malnutrition and dehydration would not have occurred."

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