Adjunctive Therapies

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Preventing Wound Chronicity

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound chronicity is defined as any wound that is physiologically impaired due to a disruption in the wound healing cascade: 1) hemostasis, 2) inflammation, 3) proliferation, and 4) maturation/remodeling. To effectively manage chronic wounds, we must understand the normal healing process and wound bed preparation (WBP). Wound chronicity can occur due to impaired angiogenesis, innervation, or cellular migration. The presence of biofilm and infection are the most common causes of delayed healing.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
The Role of Collagen

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound chronicity is an ongoing challenge for patients and health care professionals around the globe. An astonishing 4.5 million people in the United States experience lower extremity wound chronicity, while an estimated 1% are affected in the Western population with all types of chronic wounds. The cascade of wound healing does not always follow suit in an orderly fashion of hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling.

Blog Category: 
Kelly Byrd-Jenkins's picture
Outpatient Wound Care

by Kelly Byrd-Jenkins, CWS

What you do in the outpatient center is not easy, and not everyone is doing it. In many cases, they'd prefer to let us decipher this challenging demographic's path to healing. Patients we're entrusted to serve are complex in their needs, diagnoses, and compliance with our treatment plans. We see them frequently, often over extended periods of time, and due to the very nature of their mixed, long-standing wound etiologies, we don't always get to see complete and total healing for quite some time. These are etiologies we aren't managing, but must factor in to be effective. Considerable time is spent equipping these patients for personal success by coordinating resources and providing education. And for the patient whose end goal is stability, we recognize that outcome as success each time we see them.

Blog Category: 
Aletha Tippett MD's picture
technology-in-wound-care

By Aletha Tippett MD

In looking at technology that helps in wound care, how many know about—and use—lasers? Cold lasers have been used by physical therapists for years, but cosmetic lasers can also be used. I have had tremendous success using laser therapy on wounds. Healing is much improved (and faster), with less scarring. I am not a technocrat. I’m much more old-fashioned, but the laser is a wonder.

Blog Category: 
Janet Wolfson's picture
electrical stimulation therapy in wound healing

By Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

I know we have all had those patients with diagnoses that impair their wounds forming granulation tissue to fill wound depth. Perhaps there are comorbidities such as diabetes, peripheral artery disease or malnutrition. Skin flaps, cellular and/or tissue-based products for wounds, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy are alternatives, but not every patient can tolerate surgery or a hyperbaric chamber, has a shallow enough wound or enough arterial supply to make these other options successful.

Blog Category: 
Thomas Serena's picture
Evolution of the wound care specialist

By Thomas E. Serena MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

In 1972, Stephen J. Gould, the renowned paleontologist and masterful essayist, published the theory of punctuated equilibrium in which he challenged the long held belief that evolution occurred gradually over time. He knew that the creation of new species occurred when isolated populations of individuals faced environmental challenges to which they either adapted or perished. Gould asserted that this change happened rapidly when conditions favored it. Interspersed between the spikes in speciation are prolonged periods without change (equilibrium). In the case of the human species, globalization and a fairly stable environment have resulted in negligible change in our evolutionary history: we are enjoying equilibrium.

Blog Category: 
Aletha Tippett MD's picture
laser therapy used in the treatment of wounds

By Aletha Tippett MD

It would be interesting to know how many people reading this blog have tried laser therapy for wound healing. I suspect not many, and that is unfortunate because laser therapy can be a wonderful adjuvant for wound healing.

Blog Category: 
Michel Hermans's picture
google contact lens

By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

The 2014 SAWC Fall conference took place in October in Las Vegas. As always, it was good to see colleagues, share thoughts and stories, stroll through the exhibition areas and attend the lectures. As usual, the meeting was well organized although given the size of the Vegas hotels, reaching it—even from your room within the conference hotel itself—provided enough walking exercise for a week.

Blog Category: 
Lindsay Andronaco's picture

By Lindsay D. Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Sudden hearing loss affects 5-20 individuals per 100,000, which equates to about 4,000 new cases each year in the U.S. Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss, or ISSHL, is spontaneous hearing loss in one or both ears with no apparent or known cause. This condition requires urgent medical attention.

Blog Category: 
Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

The signs of summer winding down are everywhere. Leaves are beginning to look 'tired', fall clothes fill the stores and 'back to school' ads are everywhere—to the chagrin of kids and joy of parents everywhere.

Blog Category: