Amputation

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Pressure Injury Interventions in Special Populations

By the WoundSource Editors

Pressure injuries require complex care. They can be incredibly painful for patients, and they represent an enormous financial burden on the health care system. Nationally, pressure ulcers cost between approximately $9.1 and $11.6 billion annually to treat. A subset of these patients includes those who are particularly prone to developing pressure ulcers as a result of comorbid conditions. This subset includes patients who may have cognitive disabilities, those who have a spinal injury or have undergone an amputation, and bariatric patients.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Wound Care Journal Club Review

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club
Editor's note: This post is part of the Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine (TUSPM) journal review club blog series. In each blog post, a TUSPM student will review a journal article relevant to wound management and related topics and provide their evaluation of the clinical research therein.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
balancing choice with outcomes

By Aletha Tippett MD

How do you know if you are making right choice for a patient? Or, how do you know if you are even making a choice? This is true in the world of limb salvage. I have witnessed too many patients for which the risk of amputation was too much, and they died. But how do you know what the outcome will really be? You never really know, but you can make your best guess.

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Samantha Kuplicki's picture
Wound Care Case Study

By Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

This is the account of a patient case in which technology, clinician experience, and patient adherence converged to save a limb.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

What? How can limb salvage be heartbreaking? Isn't it great to save a leg and a life? Of course, that is all wonderful and is what keeps you going in this very difficult field. What is heartbreaking is when you have worked so hard and are winning the game, only to have your patient swooped away by others and the limb is amputated without ever being contacted or consulted.

Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

If you could trade places with one person for one day, who would it be? Your first thought may be an Olympian, celebrity, or even a superhero. Who wouldn't want to be awarded a gold medal, walk the red carpet, or wear a cape to soar above the big city? One thing remains certain, not one of us would choose to be one of our wound care patients. There is definitely nothing appealing about having a chronic wound.

Lindsay Andronaco's picture
Blood Pressure Cuff

By Lindsay D. Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Patients who come in with venous insufficiency ulcers and lower extremity arterial disease (LEAD) should be evaluated for compromised vascular status and the use of compression. The purpose of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) test is to support the diagnosis of vascular disease by providing an objective indicator of arterial perfusion to a lower extremity.

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Mark Hinkes's picture

By Dr. Mark Hinkes, DPM

Twenty first century technology is helping people with diabetes to heal foot ulcers. An Australian colleague, for example, is developing an application that reminds people with diabetes to control their blood sugars with prompts and instructions, and allows them to upload a picture of their wound for their podiatrist to evaluate.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

In considering this question as to whether amputation can be palliative, let’s keep clear that these are two separate subjects that sometimes interact. It is key to always keep our goals in mind. What is the goal in palliative care? The goals are to provide comfort, relieve pain, prevent infection, and improve or maintain quality of life. These goals are always to be in concert with the desires and wishes of the individual patient.

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Lydia Meyers's picture

By Lydia A Meyers RN, MSN, CWCN

Diabetes is the number one cause of amputation for wound care patients. Individuals with diabetes need monitoring and education about the dangers they face on a daily basis due to their condition. Diabetic ulcers often begin with a simple bump, as a callous or by stepping on something.

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