COVID-19

Ron Sherman's picture

By Ronald A. Sherman, MD

Challenges are nothing new for those of us who work in health care. Every day, we triumph over difficult situations. Yet, the current coronavirus outbreak has complicated even the simplest of procedures and has brought us additional challenges.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

The World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic on March 11, 2020. Whether you are a provider or a frontline health care professional, we are experiencing a worldwide increase in “unavoidable” medical device–related pressure injuries (MDRPIs) during the current COVID-19 pandemic. Health care workers are challenged with a higher risk of pressure injury development secondary to prolonged wear time of the N95 mask, face shield, and goggle personal protective equipment (PPE). The intensity of one or more factors of pressure, moisture, shear, and friction influence pressure injury risk.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

The current COVID-19 pandemic has changed various aspects of care across the health care continuum. Health care professionals have been forced to develop different strategies for engagement for those patients at higher risk for infection, those who are quarantined, and those who have tested positive for COVID-19. We know that telemedicine cannot replace an in-person visit to a provider, but during this time of crisis it serves as an advanced approach in wound care.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound care professionals are feeling the challenges of caring for patients with wounds during the COVID-19 pandemic. Coming together during this time is paramount for developing the best strategy for delivering quality of care across the continuum. Providers should implement wound management protocols for their specific health care setting to be most efficient.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Health care providers are currently faced with an all-time high of challenges and strain related to the crisis of COVID-19. They are confronted with short staffing, limited personal protective equipment supplies, delegated duties outside their role, and the worry of being infected with the virus. There are health care workers who are not living at home because of the high risk of infecting their family members and others who are quarantining themselves within their homes away from their families. As health care workers focus on working hard on the frontlines for their patients, they must also remember to take care of themselves. Learning and applying self-care practices are just as important to ensure that health care workers remain safe and healthy to optimize delivery of care for their patients.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

COVID-19: The name of the disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). The abbreviation COVID-19 is short for coronavirus disease 2019.

Fit test: A 15- to 20-minute testing of the seal between the respirator's facepiece and your face. After passing a fit test with a respirator, you must use the exact same make, model, style, and size respirator on the job.

Liquid sealant: Liquid skin sealants are designed to protect vulnerable areas from the effects of skin injury. They form a transparent protective coating on the skin. Indicated for use on stage 1 pressure injuries and low-exudating stage 2 pressure ulcers, pressure points and bony prominences, and under adhesive products to protect the skin.

Holly Hovan's picture
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Telehealth

By Holly Hovan MSN, RN-BC, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

The novel coronavirus, responsible for the COVID-19 disease, has certainly impacted us all somehow. Whether you work in a hospital setting, an outpatient clinic, a doctor's office, or a specialty setting, this pandemic has altered the lives and careers of all of us in health care.

Lauren Lazarevski's picture
Personal Protective Equipment

By Lauren Lazarevski RN, BSN, CWOCN

Calling the COVID-19 pandemic an "unprecedented time" is an understatement. In this time of uncertainty, predicting what to expect can provide some comfort via preparation for the future. We can presume several implications for wound care professionals, based on the clinical course and community response to our evolving situation. Wound care health professionals should be prepared for some unique circumstances on the other side of the curve.

Industry News's picture

By Industry News

March 30, 2020 – As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve, focusing on mitigating the disease and maintaining a stock of personal protective equipment (PPE) has changed standard procedures. Many institutions have reportedly closed wound clinics preventing wound patients from obtaining much needed services, procedures and surgeries. Chronic wound patients often present with other comorbidities such as older age, diabetes, hypertension, lung disease, peripheral arterial disease, venous insufficiency and obesity, any of which increases their susceptibility to COVID-19. The unintended consequence of losing access to wound care can increase the risk of the wound deteriorating which could require hospitalization and possible amputation. Wound care is essential to the health of wound patients. For this reason, the Alliance for Wound Care Stakeholders drafted a letter that wound care clinicians may use to justify ongoing care.

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Industry News's picture

By Industry News

Hudson, Ohio. – April 16, 2020 – GEMCO Medical, a medical supply wholesaler and third-party logistics provider of diabetes supplies and other medical products, announced today the adaption of its GEMCORE360º Silicone Lite Foam Wound Dressing to help provide a layer of facial protection to health care workers who are wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) for long periods of time. In addition, to locally support COVID-19 efforts, GEMCO Medical is donating 8,000 pieces with adaption guides to University Hospitals and the Cleveland Clinic.

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