Infection Management

WoundSource Editors's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Toronto, Canada – November 4, 2019 – MolecuLight Inc., the world's leader in handheld fluorescence imaging for real-time visualization of bacteria for chronic wounds, has been informed by the American Medical Association (AMA) that in its summary of panel actions September 2019 meeting, the CPT® Editorial Panel accepted the addition of new Category III codes 0X30T, 0X31T to report "wound bacterial localization and treatment" effective date July 1, 2020 to enable a reimbursement pathway for point-of-care fluorescence wound imaging. At that time a novel code excluding the "X" will be reported by the AMA when the final datafiles are distributed by the AMA. Point-of-care fluorescence wound imaging is achieved using MolecuLight's handheld fluorescence imaging device, the i:X®.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Preventing Surgical Site Infections

By the WoundSource Editors

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) define a surgical site infection (SSI) as "an infection that occurs after surgery in the part of the body where the surgery took place." The CDC go on to say the infection can be superficial involving just the skin or more serious infections can occur that involve deeper structures, such as tissue under the skin, organs, or implanted devices or materials. The CDC offer tools and guidelines to prevent SSIs and provide education to the public. Public education includes tips and advice on how to prevent patient surgical sites from becoming infected. Although such steps may not always prevent a surgical wound from becoming infected, it is always important to involve the patient in postoperative care.

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Surgical Wound Infection Assessment

By the WoundSource Editors

With an associated cost of $3.5 billion to $10 billion spent annually on surgical site infections (SSIs) and complications in the United States, it is important to know how to assess for surgical wound complications. There is a difference between the normal cascade response and a brewing infection. Symptoms of infection are often the first clue that there is more occurring in the wound than meets the eye.

Hy-Tape International's picture
Management Strategies for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

By Hy-Tape International

According to a published study, the global prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is 6.3%, with male patients and older adults being the most likely to be affected.1 This prevalence, coupled with the potential for complications and the severe effect on quality of life the condition can have, makes DFUs one of today's most serious health care issues. To reduce the effects of DFUs and improve outcomes for patients, it is critical that health care professionals rapidly identify DFUs and implement best practice dressing and management strategies.

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Classification Systems for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

By the WoundSource Editors

In patients with diabetes, the lifetime risk of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is approximately 25%, and these wounds are frequently a source of pain and discomfort. Severe cases can even result in amputation of a portion of or the entire affected extremity. Proper classification of DFUs is essential for selecting the appropriate treatment course and coordinating care for the patient. Several systems are frequently used in classifying DFUs, although there is no universally agreed-on standard.

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Biofilm

By the WoundSource Editors

Biofilm: this term is frequently used in the wound care space, but biofilm continues to be largely undertreated in wound care. What do the bedside nurse or clinician need to know about biofilm? Should clinicians care less about biofilm on a maintenance or palliative wound versus a wound they are actively trying to heal? Let's address these questions and get to the root of the biofilm in managing complex wound cases.

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wound infection

by the WoundSource Editors

Wound infection is a complex process that can be affected by a variety of factors, some of which inhibit the ability to heal. The first stage of healing, the inflammatory stage, is particularly susceptible to chronicity. Chronicity can be influenced by many factors, with a common contributor being the presence of infection. The wound infection continuum begins with contamination and, if left unchecked, will progress to systematic infection.

Hy-Tape International's picture
Preventing Cross-Infection

by Hy-Tape International

Infections are common and serious complications associated with post-surgical wounds. In wounds resulting from clean surgery, 8% become infected among the general population and 25% among those over 60 years of age. Preventing these infections can help reduce costs, improve patient outcomes, and save lives. It is critical that health care professionals understand the risk of cross-contamination and take steps to prevent it.

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SSI

by the WoundSource Editors

Surgical site infections (SSIs) account for 20% of total documented infections each year and cost approximately $34,000 per episode. SSIs are responsible for increased readmission rates, length of stay, reoperation, morbidity, and mortality, as well as increased overall health care costs.1,2