Infection Management

Martha Kelso's picture
Reduction in Antibiotics Image

by Martha Kelso, RN, HBOT

Numerous brands of hypochlorous acid have emerged in the last few years and have been marketed as "ideal" products for use in wound cleansing. These statements, of course, should draw speculation because it is rare for a single product to be used on all wounds, all clients, in all care settings, all the time, thus making it "ideal." Let's explore the role of hypochlorous acid in wound management and wound healing and see how it assists with reduction in antibiotic usage.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

by the WoundSource Editors

Acute wound: Alteration in skin integrity such as a simple laceration or a surgical wound that moves normally through the healing process and heals in a predictable timeframe without complication.

Antibiotic resistant: Organisms that have the ability to alter themselves genetically so that antibiotics do not have an inhibitory or lethal effect on them, thus allowing continued proliferation.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Surgical Site Infections

by the WoundSource Editors

Of the millions of surgical procedures performed annually, most surgical site wounds heal without complications. Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common complications that may occur after surgery, and that may delay healing, therefore increasing the cost of care.1

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Multidrug-Resistant Organisms

by the WoundSource Editors

Among the greatest triumphs of modern medicine were the identification and naming of the Penicillium mold by Alexander Fleming in 1928, and its ability to inhibit bacteria growth on culture medium. Penicillin was then developed by the team of Heatley, Chain, and Florey in England during the Second World War.1 This miracle brought about the ability to cure previously untreatable diseases and devastating infections that had high morbidity and mortality rates. Along with the great efficacy of penicillin was the added benefit of very few side effects. This area of research brought about the era of antibiotic production, which began in the 1950s.

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Strategies for Infection Prevention

by the WoundSource Editors

Effective wound management and the prevention of infection for patients with wounds are not only key to wound improvement, but also to avoiding a slide into a state of chronicity. Unfortunately, many wounds that start out simple turn into chronic wounds because of the complications associated with comorbid conditions and secondary infection. Approximately 6.7 million patients in the United States are affected by chronic wounds, and the pervasiveness of these wounds and their connection to other chronic illnesses are underappreciated. That said, estimates for treatment costs are in excess of $50 billion annually.1

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Clinical Challenges in Diagnosing Infected Wounds

by the WoundSource Editors

Given the impact of infection on delayed wound healing, determining the presence of colonization and infection is imperative to achieving healed outcomes. Chronic wounds are always contaminated, and timely implementation of management and treatment interventions is a key component of the plan of care.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
Diabetes and wound healing

For individuals with diabetes, all wounds are a serious health concern and require careful attention. Because of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, skin cuts and blisters often go unnoticed until they become more complicated to heal. In addition, internal wounds such as ingrown toenails, skin ulcers, or calluses can cause breakdown of tissue and an increased risk of infection. Even small cuts and insect bites can cause wound healing difficulties in patients with diabetes. Here are common factors of diabetes that impact wound healing:

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Hy-Tape International's picture
Wound Care and Infection Management

by Hy-Tape International

Infections are one of the most serious complications associated with wounds. Even for wounds resulting from clean surgery, studies find the infection rate to be 8% among the general population, and 25% among those above 60 years old.1 This makes infection prevention one of the most important components of effective wound management. By implementing wound care best practices using effective, sterile medical tape, nurses and other healthcare professionals can make dressings more secure and reduce the risk of cross contamination, improving patient outcomes and promoting rapid wound healing.2,3,4

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Samantha Kuplicki's picture
surgical site infection prevention

by Samantha Kuplicki, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACNS-BC, CWS, CWCN, CFCN

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most common hospital-acquired infections, accounting for 20% of total documented infections each year and costing approximately $34,000 per episode. SSIs are responsible for increased readmission rates, length of stay, reoperation, patient morbidity and mortality, as well as increased overall health care costs.

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Janet Wolfson's picture
wound infection treatment using alternative modalities

by Janet Wolfson, PT, CLWT, CWS, CLT-LANA

As I was commuting in to work a few Saturdays ago, I listened to The People’s Pharmacy on NPR. The topic was non-pharmacological treatment of infection, so being a wound care professional, I immediately started thinking of the ways I treat wound infections. In addition to oral, topical or IV antibiotics, as a PT there are modalities available to me to treat wound infections.

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