Mentorship

Catherine Milne's picture
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Mentoring in Wound Care

by Catherine Milne, APRN, MSN, ANP/ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

We need mentors in wound care. Why? Our number of wound care providers cannot meet the overwhelming needs of our patients, our traditional practice patterns are changing from acute to post-acute care, reimbursement models are variable and technology is rapidly shifting. Nursing, physical therapy and medical schools are teaching less and less wound care. Many times, what is being taught is archaic.

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WoundSource Editors's picture
wound care slide presentation

By Jeanne Cunningham, Founder of WoundSource

After seeing about 100 pictures of wounds, I was beginning to feel sick. The year was 1985 and there I was, a recent college graduate in my 20s, sitting in a cramped office at the Crozer Chester Medical Center in Chester, PA, watching slide after slide of feet, elbows, legs, bottoms, in fact, every part of the human body with open, colorful wounds.

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WoundSource Editors's picture

By Karen Zulkowski, DNS, RN Wound Course Instructor, Excelsior College

Dr. Karen Zulkowski is recently retired from her role as associate professor at Montana State University-Bozeman, where she taught evidence based practice and lead field research for nearly 20 years. She began wound care research in her early days in graduate school, eventually obtaining her DNS from New York State University at Buffalo. She is currently working on the International Ostomy Guidelines for 2020 and is executive edit for the WCET Journal. Throughout her accomplished career, Dr. Zulkowski has displayed a commitment to advancing knowledge of wound care through research, mentoring and teaching.

WoundSource Editors's picture
Martin Vera, LVN, CWS

By the Wound Source Editors

Martin D. Vera, LVN, CWS is the Coordinator of Wound Management at Patience Home Health Care in San Antonio, Texas. He has been working in the wound care field for nearly 20 years, helping countless patients, teaching wound care best practices, and improving standards at his care facility. His career has demonstrated an extraordinary passion for patient care, a commitment to doing the right thing, and a strong faith.

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Fabiola Jimenez, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

By Fabiola Jimenez, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

Fabiola Jimenez is a Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse and Adult Clinical Nurse Specialist at Detroit Medical Center Huron Valley Sinai Hospital, a small community hospital of 158 beds in eastern Michigan. She has been a nurse since 1988, when she entered the field after graduating from the University of Oklahoma. Throughout her accomplished career, her work has demonstrated a dedication to caring for patients and a lifelong commitment to educating herself and others.

Michel Hermans's picture
journal article review

By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

The first time you see your name published as the lead author of an article you are filled with pride. If an article is rejected you are filled with frustration.

Cheryl Carver's picture

As a child, I did my best to teach my stuffed animals. I lined them up perfectly, and set up my little card table and chairs. I couldn’t wait to grow up and become a real teacher. Teaching what, I didn’t know. Well, since then I have become a wound care educator for physicians and nurses. I’ve been thinking a lot lately about wound care education. Not education in terms of course curriculum, but education as the process of transforming one’s thinking and perspective.

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Diana Gallagher's picture
family

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

I recently had the privilege of attending a patient's funeral. I would imagine that most nurses attend funerals for special patients from time to time. As a Certified Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse (CWOCN®), I often care for patients with chronic conditions. Over time, I get to know them and their families very well. A lot of them have become more than patients…some of them are even my friends. I celebrate their successes and I mourn their losses.

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Diana Gallagher's picture
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By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

The importance of being exposed to positive role models is critical in nurturing one’s development and growth. In nursing, it is an important element that helps move an individual along the path from novice to expert. Take a moment and think back to your experience in nursing school. If your experience was like most, you were exposed to both very positive role models that inspired you to aspire to be your BEST and sadly, a few role models that were less than positive. As a whole, my nursing faculty provided a strong example of what a nurse should be.

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Diana Gallagher's picture

By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

It's finally here. Thanksgiving has been put away along with the good china and crystal. Our family, like countless other families across the country, enjoyed the traditional rounds of football games, the company of family and friends and far too much food. As much as I enjoy Thanksgiving, I love Christmas. I simply adore everything about the holiday season which for me begins the day after Thanksgiving.