Nutrition

Christine Miller's picture

Christine Miller, DPM, PhD

The role of nutrition in wound healing has been heavily explored since the early part of the 20th century. Addressing the proper balance of both macronutrients and micronutrients is a crucial part of the systemic treatment plan for patients with chronic wounds. Nutrition professionals are often highly valued members of any multidisciplinary healing team. There can often be adverse consequences of malnutrition, such as compromised immune systems and increases in hospital readmission rates. As modern-day clinicians with access to advanced therapies, we may think that adding nutrient supplementation to a care regimen is a contemporary concept, but in reality it is steeped in history.

Becky Naughton's picture

By Becky Naughton, RN, MSN, FNP-C, WCC

In Part 1 of this series on recalcitrant wounds, we started our discussion on some factors on why wounds may seem to stall or stop healing. It can be very difficult in trying to treat a wound that seems to resist all efforts to get it to heal. In Part 1, we discussed some signs of a recalcitrant wound, exploring alternative etiologies behind a wound and how dressings can impact a wound’s ability to heal. In Part 2, we will discuss other possible factors that can cause a recalcitrant wound, including, infection, prolonged or chronic inflammation, the presence of necrotic tissue, the edge effect, nutrition as well as socio-economic factors. We must also bring up the fact that, due to underlying comorbidities or complications, some wounds may never heal and how to start a conversation about this.