Public Policy

Heidi Cross's picture

I have been there, done that. Sitting in the fact witness chair in front of a plaintiff attorney who is wildly waving a copy of my facility’s wound care policy and procedure, demanding to know why certain things weren’t included in the policy, and why what was in the policy was not followed to the letter. Plaintiff attorneys have the right to demand copies of a facility’s policy and procedures as part of discovery and will go through them with a fine-tooth comb, compare what is in the policy with the care that was provided, and fault the facility for any deviations. It goes without saying that I promptly returned to my facility with a new understanding for how our policy was written and possible gaps and weaknesses.

Marcia Nusgart's picture
Cost associated with chronic wounds

by Marcia Nusgart, Executive Director, Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders

Editor's note:This blog post is part of the WoundSource Trending Topics series, bringing you insight into the latest clinical issues and advancement in wound management, with contributions by the WoundSource Editorial Advisory Board.

Industry News's picture

By The Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders

In their quarterly Alliance Advocacy Update, the Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders' (Alliance) provides an update on their ongoing advocacy initiatives on behalf of their clinical association members to ensure access, coverage and payment to wound care procedures and technologies for patients and providers.

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Thomas Serena's picture
hyperbaric oxygen therapy

By Thomas E. Serena MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

In 1950, J. Edgar Hoover published the first edition of the FBI’s most wanted list. Since that time, no less than 512 fugitives have been featured. Many surrendered after learning that their mug shots were hanging on every post office wall in the country. In medicine, we have an equally infamous public posting: The Office of Inspector General’s (OIG) work list. In 2017, it turns out that hyperbaric medicine services are "public enemy number one." But please, do not surrender just yet.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
Affordable Care Act

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

As we embark on our journey into 2017, many are concerned about the road ahead. A new President and GOP dominated Congress have promised to make health care reform a priority. There have been numerous articles and opinion pieces written about the path these changes will take and what they will mean to patients, caregivers, and clinicians alike.

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Jeffrey M. Levine's picture
documentation of pressure injury never event

By Jeffrey M. Levine MD, AGSF, CWS-P

Editor's Note: The views expressed in Dr. Levine’s posts are solely those of the author, and do not represent the views of any medical school or national organization.

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Industry News's picture

By The Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders

The Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders (Alliance) played a key role in educating the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and its advisory panel on the role and real-world value of antimicrobial wound care dressings, as the FDA considered a regulatory classification of these products that could impact access and availability to wound care providers and patients.

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Industry News's picture

By The Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders

The Alliance of Wound Care Stakeholders' (Alliance) quarterly update provides an overview of ongoing advocacy initiatives to ensure access, coverage and payment to wound care procedures and technologies for patients. This update includes current action items, updates on key areas of focus from the past quarter, and future issues for the second half of 2016 that the Alliance is tracking that are of importance to the wound care community, including clinicians who may be impacted by policy changes.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
off label drug prescription

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

Providers may view off label drug use (OLDU) for wounds as the "new wave". However, if there is little or no scientific evidence supporting the practice, it can possibly lead to more problems than good. Keep in mind that not every health care setting embraces off label drug use. For example, state surveyors view OLDU differently in long-term care versus home care. Providers should avoid any risk of being involved in a pressure injury investigation. OLDU may be considered a factor in the event of such an investigation. Hospice patients are considered to be in more of a "dying with dignity" category, therefore OLDU may be considered more acceptable.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
medical documentation

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

In my role as a consultant and educator, I thought it would be interesting to acquire a handful of perspectives from wound care providers who work in the long-term care arena, and explore their responses.

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