Risk Assessment

Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA, WCC

For those of you who cannot remember the now deceased comedian Chris Farley, did not find his humor funny or simply cannot remember any of his memorable performances; I suggest you move on to another, less controversial, "here's how to use scissors" type of blog.

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

March is here and for many of us winter continues unabated. The bright news is that Daylight Savings Time is coming so spring is in the offing. What is less certain is how the 'Sequester' is going to affect health care. While there has been much debate on who is to blame and how dire the consequences of across-the-board budget cuts will be, the reality is we need to be prepared for the possible impact on our patients and clinical practices.

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Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

By Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

Ah February! The month of love and romance. Regardless of whether Buckeye Chuck or Punxsutawney Phil predicted an early spring or 6 more weeks of winter for those of us who live in the northern climes winter seems cold, dark and endless. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a real possibility and the idea of hibernating until spring is tempting. If you are living with a chronic wound, this time of year can be especially problematic. Getting out for groceries, doctors appointments, or worship can be a major undertaking. The challenges for home care nurses are incredible.

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture

Part 1 in a series discussing the challenges and opportunities in patient/family education

By Paula Erwin-Toth, MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS

Mr. Gillan is a 72 year old man with venous insufficiency. He presents with a venous ulcer on his left lower leg. He has several co-morbid conditions including hypertension, cataracts, and osteoarthritis which includes his hands. His primary caregiver is his 74 year old wife who suffers from diabetes and mild dementia. They do not have any family living nearby. He is being discharged to his home with a primary wound dressing and compression wraps. His discharge instructions include requests for Home Care nursing and follow up with vascular medicine and a pedorthist.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett, MD

This is a statement the cardiologist made to my patient the other day. My patient is a diabetic man with severe neuropathy, resulting in pain and numbness in his feet, as well as difficulty walking. He also has a serious cardiac history with multiple myocardial infarctions. When he first came to me he was, of course, on a statin medication for his heart. One of my tenets for treating neuropathy is to stop statin treatment because it can increase neuropathy 26 fold (1).

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY, PT. 7

I know we all look forward to the New Year as one of promise, self-evaluation, and a new vision for brotherhood among men. In that spirit, as this is the first of my “ramblings” for 2012, I want to take the time to offer my heartfelt wishes for each of you that read my blog to have a horrifically catastrophic and agonizing condition, something equivalent to what is felt when discovering the first scratch on your new car.

Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 3

I just had the most amazing thing happen: I received a letter from my hospital informing me that they were considering creating an Open-Heart Surgery Center. Other than myself, there will be Radiologists, Family Practitioners, and Pathologists all participating in the program. In an effort to share the proceeds from participating in this venture, all participants will be offered four hour time periods throughout the week in which to practice this new specialty. Recognizing that we are not experts in this area of medicine, each of us will be required to take a one-week course in open-heart surgery before being able to hang our shingles outside the clinic.

Diane Krasner's picture

From The Clinical Editor

By Diane Krasner PhD, RN, CWCN, CWS, MAPWCA, FAAN

Introduction

The push towards safety by regulators and payers reflects the evidence that safe healthcare practices have numerous benefits – from reducing sentinel events to improving quality outcomes and helping to avoid litigation (1, 2, 3, 4). The wound care community has been slow to adopt the safety mantra . . . but the time has come to put your “safety lenses” on and to view wound prevention and treatment as a safety issue.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

What is palliative care relative to wound treatment? In short, it is about humanity, caring and compassion. Today I saw a 90 year-old woman in a nursing home. She had hip and ankle fractures, and developed a sacral ulcer in the hospital. She was in excruciating pain, screaming at every touch. To correct her turned-in hips, she was trussed up in a hip abductor device – she called this “the dragon” – that was both uncomfortable and painful.

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