Wound Care

Catherine Milne's picture
Mentoring in Wound Care

by Catherine Milne, APRN, MSN, ANP/ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

We need mentors in wound care. Why? Our number of wound care providers cannot meet the overwhelming needs of our patients, our traditional practice patterns are changing from acute to post-acute care, reimbursement models are variable and technology is rapidly shifting. Nursing, physical therapy and medical schools are teaching less and less wound care. Many times, what is being taught is archaic.

Emily Greenstein's picture
Patient-Centered Wound Care

By Emily Greenstein, APRN, CNP, CWON

Recently I was able to attend the Spring Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC) in San Antonio, Texas. I attended many different lectures, presented, and sat on a few expert panels. The one recurring theme that kept echoing was the need to look at the whole picture. Often, as wound specialists, we get in the habit of looking just at the wound without taking into consideration the underlying comorbidities and potential causes of the wound in the first place. This got me thinking, how do I treat a new patient who comes into my wound center? I decided to put together the top five "tips" to remember to look at the whole patient, not just the hole in the patient (as originally stated by Dr. Carrie Sussman, DPT, PT).

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Industry News's picture

Woodbury, CT – February 15, 2019 – The American College of Wound Healing and Tissue Repair (ACWHTR) was founded almost a decade ago, with the sole purpose of helping to promote wound care towards specialty status. The ACWHTR submitted a proposal to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) seeking formal acceptance and approval of this specialty at the highest level of medical education in the US.

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Ivy Razmus's picture
Product Selection

by Ivy Razmus, RN, PhD, CWOCN

As we continually focus on improving our skills in prevention and management of skin and wounds, we are beginning to understand that one size does not fit all; or, in other words, prevention and management in wound care are dependent on the size and age of the patient. In wound care, one method of care does not fit all types of patients. Although those clinicians who work with younger populations know this to be true based on our personal experience, this can be a problem if the purchasing of products for younger patients' skin and wound care is decided without the input of the providers and caregivers who care for them.

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Cathy Wogamon's picture
Pilonidal Cyst

By Cathy Wogamon, DNP, MSN, FNP-BC, CWON, CFCN

A pilonidal cyst is a pocket located at the top of the cleft of the buttocks that usually results from an embedded or stiff hair. This area may remain dormant for years and cause no major issues; however, often the embedded or stiff hair may cause the cyst to become inflamed and infected, resulting in an abscess that requires incision to drain the infected material. These abscesses can recur, causing the patient to require surgical intervention to remove the cyst. After surgery, some patients tend not to heal well, resulting in a chronic tracking wound in an area that is difficult to heal.

Emily Greenstein's picture
Wound Care

by Emily Greenstein, APRN, CNP, CWON

"When I grow up, I want to be a wound care specialist." That's not something you hear kids going around saying. Sure, kids want to be doctors or nurses. But wound care specialist?

When you think about it, being a wound specialist is not a glamorous position, unlike being a neurosurgeon. The best quote that I ever heard from a colleague of mine was, "No one wants to do wound care; wound care isn't sexy." This may be true, but what is wound care then? To me it is ever changing, it is learning new things (most of which are not found in text books), and it is about helping patients heal both emotionally and physically from a chronic condition.

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Kathy Gallagher's picture
Acute Wounds

By Kathy Gallagher, DNP, APRN-FNP, CMC, UMC, BC, WCC, CWS, FACCWS

Welcome to the first in a series of blogs focusing on acute surgical wound management. Future segments will discuss steps toward developing an acute surgical wound service (ASWS) and tips reflective of successful healing strategies.

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Emily Greenstein's picture
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Wound Care Specialist

by Emily Greenstein, APRN, CNP, CWON

Did you know that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a page dedicated to preparing for a zombie apocalypse?

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Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, DAPWCA, FACCWS, CLTC – Wound Educator

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WoundSource Editors's picture
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WoundSource Digital Edition

by Miranda J. Henry, Editorial Director

It's been over two decades since WoundSource first landed in the hands of clinicians practicing wound care. While patient outcomes remain the primary objective in managing wounds, health care providers have so many more ways to support healing. I'm talking about improved assessment and documentation systems, more complementary modalities to jumpstart complex chronic wounds, and more (and better) modes of supporting patient compliance and staff protocol.

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