Advanced Therapies

Robin Lenz and Fahad Hussain's picture

By Dr. Lenz and Dr. Hussain

For the patient, the prevention of sores and injuries is better than treating them. Pressure-relieving mattresses may be essential for preventing pressure injuries (bed sores). These mattresses aid in relieving and redistributing pressure and can thereby cause a reduction of friction and shearing. Pressure-relieving mattresses provide support for the body and reduce the amount of force applied to a given area. Thus, for bedbound patients and patients who are unable to reposition themselves, these types of beds can be especially beneficial.

Robin Lenz and Fahad Hussain's picture

By Dr. Lenz and Dr. Hussain

Heel pressure injuries and various forms of ulcers are easy to identify, but are you overlooking sleeping position as a cause for wounds in other locations? Do you have a wound you are sure is venous but has normal venous insufficiency testing results and fails to respond to compression? Can pressure while sleeping slow or stop healing in your patients with venous and arterial wounds? Do you ask patients about their sleeping position in your history taking and physical examination? After reading this article, you will be able to ask patients about their sleeping habits and heal more wounds with that knowledge

Holly Hovan's picture

By Holly Hovan, MSN, GERO-BC, APRN, CWOCN-AP

Moisture-associated skin damage (MASD) is becoming increasingly prevalent in today’s health care system. Often associated with discomfort and pain, MASD ultimately negatively impacts quality of life. MASD is usually broken down into 3 or 4 categories, most commonly incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD), intertriginous dermatitis, periwound dermatitis, and peristomal dermatitis. In this blog, I focus on the prevention and treatment of IAD and subsequent pressure injuries in critical care through a nurse-led approach.

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By the WoundSource Editors

The process of wound healing ideally progresses from inflammation to epithelialization and, finally, remodeling. If at any point bacterial (or fungal) colonization becomes prominent, the process of wound healing is disrupted. The creation of biofilm is a microbial defense mechanism that stalls the trajectory of healthy wound healing and can contribute to the development of a chronic wound. It is estimated that 90% of chronic wounds and 6% of acute wounds contain biofilms generated by microbes. Epidemiologically, chronic wounds impact 2% of the entire US population. Because of this large impact, knowledge of proper wound healing and use of clinical tools to assist the wound healing process are essential.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Chronic and nonhealing wounds are a worldwide issue and are becoming more difficult to treat. In the United States alone, according to Medicare, over 8 million Americans have chronic wounds that cost the national health care system between $18.1 and $96.8 billion per year. If standard treatment does not adequately heal a wound, additional methods of wound care treatment may be required, and the underlying disorder must be examined to determine the need for advanced wound care modalities. Advanced wound care therapies are interventions that are used after standard wound care has failed.

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By the WoundSource Editors

Moist wound healing is the current cost-effective, evidence-based modality to achieve faster wound healing rates and decreased pain and infection. As part of the wound healing process, acute wounds produce reparative exudates consisting of growth factors to support extracellular matrix production; in contrast, chronic wounds contain inflammatory-producing exudates studded with cytokines and proteases that may help maintain the inflammatory phase but can exert destructive effects on the fragile wound bed and may extend to the periwound surface.

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By WoundSource Editors

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are open sores or wounds caused by a combination of factors that include neuropathy (lack of sensation), poor circulation, foot deformities, friction or pressure, trauma, and duration of diabetes with complication risks. DFUs occur in 34% of people with diabetes, and approximately 14% to 24 % of patients with diabetes who develop a DFU will require an amputation.

by Tia Gray, PTA, CLT, CWT and Donald Thomas, PT, DPT, CLT-LANA, CWT

As lymphedema and wound care therapists at Penn Therapy & Fitness, we often see scenarios like those in the cases described in our abstract presented as a poster at the recent Symposium on Advanced Wound Care. Conditions such as lymphedema, chronic venous insufficiency, and phlebolymphedema that manifest in patients with wounds can lead to catastrophic and life-threatening skin breakdown (degradation). Complications of infections associated with lymphedema include cellulitis, lymphangitis, lymphadenitis, and ulcerations where protein-rich fluid provides a perfect medium for microbial growth.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

For the wound healing process to be successful, it must pass through four stages: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling or maturing. Wound healing requires inflammation, but it can be detrimental if it is persistent or encouraged by other factors, such as infection. It is during this phase that wound healing is most likely to stall.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Patient-centered care is a philosophy that stresses communication, collaboration, and health promotion while also respecting patients' expectations, autonomy, and values. It is at the heart of global efforts to enhance the delivery of safe, high-quality, and cost-effective health care. Patients who are involved in their own treatment are more motivated and capable of caring for their own health and well-being, according to most research, because they understand the impact the treatment will have on their health.