Atypical and Complex Wounds

Christine Miller's picture
Wound Healing During COVID

By Christine Miller DPM, PhD

It is an understatement to say that these are trying and uncertain times, as we ride this unpredictable wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. All of us in wound healing as part of the greater health care force are deemed essential, so we cannot "shelter in place." As health care workers, we have to balance our duty to render care with that of protecting ourselves, a tricky tightrope balancing act. The media coverage of this pandemic is constant and anxiety producing, but it has made me ponder the term essential and what that truly means to our patients.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

The World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic on March 11, 2020. Whether you are a provider or a frontline health care professional, we are experiencing a worldwide increase in “unavoidable” medical device–related pressure injuries (MDRPIs) during the current COVID-19 pandemic. Health care workers are challenged with a higher risk of pressure injury development secondary to prolonged wear time of the N95 mask, face shield, and goggle personal protective equipment (PPE). The intensity of one or more factors of pressure, moisture, shear, and friction influence pressure injury risk.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

The current COVID-19 pandemic has changed various aspects of care across the health care continuum. Health care professionals have been forced to develop different strategies for engagement for those patients at higher risk for infection, those who are quarantined, and those who have tested positive for COVID-19. We know that telemedicine cannot replace an in-person visit to a provider, but during this time of crisis it serves as an advanced approach in wound care.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Wound care professionals are feeling the challenges of caring for patients with wounds during the COVID-19 pandemic. Coming together during this time is paramount for developing the best strategy for delivering quality of care across the continuum. Providers should implement wound management protocols for their specific health care setting to be most efficient.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

COVID-19: The name of the disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). The abbreviation COVID-19 is short for coronavirus disease 2019.

Fit test: A 15- to 20-minute testing of the seal between the respirator's facepiece and your face. After passing a fit test with a respirator, you must use the exact same make, model, style, and size respirator on the job.

Liquid sealant: Liquid skin sealants are designed to protect vulnerable areas from the effects of skin injury. They form a transparent protective coating on the skin. Indicated for use on stage 1 pressure injuries and low-exudating stage 2 pressure ulcers, pressure points and bony prominences, and under adhesive products to protect the skin.

Becky Naughton's picture

By Becky Naughton, RN, MSN, FNP-C, WCC

If you've ever had a painful red bump after shaving, you've probably chalked this up to razor burn or an ingrown hair. After an irritating day or so, the bumps will likely fade and disappear on their own, and you don't give it any more thought. But what if these bumps just kept growing and became more and more painful? And even worse, what if they developed in sensitive areas such as the axilla or the groin? What if these bumps got so bad, they eventually opened, started to drain, and even formed tracts under the skin? Not only are these bumps painful, but they are also embarrassing. Forget about wearing a sleeveless shirt or bathing suit in the summer. Would people think you had a horrific contagious disease? You go to doctor after doctor, but no one has been able to treat this successfully. The bumps may disappear for some time but then suddenly reappear. They may leave scars that seem to open and close persistently, and at times they may become infected, requiring antibiotic therapy. Finally, you get the diagnosis for this awful condition: hidradenitis suppurativa (HS).

Becky Naughton's picture
Calciphylaxis

By Becky Naughton, RN, MSN, FNP-C, WCC

Picture this: you've been seeing a patient in your wound center for the last several months to treat a slowly healing post-operative abdominal wound. The wound has been gradually responding to an assortment of treatments, including initial wound vacuum therapy after the surgery, followed by alginate and now a collagen dressing. The wound is getting smaller and has new granulation tissue at the base. You're actually a bit surprised that it's healing so nicely because the patient has multiple serious chronic illnesses, including severe chronic kidney disease that requires hemodialysis sessions three times per week, type 2 diabetes, morbid obesity, cardiovascular disease, and peripheral vascular disease.

Becky Naughton's picture
Weird Wounds

By Becky Naughton, RN, MSN, FNP-C, WCC

When I was in my APRN program, a phrase that I heard from an instructor has stuck with me throughout my practice: "When it comes to diagnosing, if you hear hooves, think horses, not zebras." Essentially, think of the obvious or likely reason first before jumping to a more obscure diagnosis. In the large majority of cases, the more common ailment is likely the cause. But what happens if the symptoms just don't quite add up?

Becky Naughton's picture
platelet-rich plasma

Becky Naughton, RN, MSN, FNP-C, WCC

What if I told you that there is a substance that we can isolate from your own blood that can help to heal the most difficult wound? I envision a scene out of "Star Trek" where Bones does a quick scan of his patient, draws some blood, runs it through some machines, and then out pops a seemingly magical elixir. He studies this new yellow substance and then injects it back into his patient (with a quick and seemingly painless puff from his high-tech injector gun).

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Venous ulcers pose a worldwide problem that comes with high recurrence rates, risk of infection, and substantial costs to treat. Health care professionals must be knowledgeable about underlying causes and pathological features. The comorbidities that are often associated with venous ulcers contribute to these lesions and prolong healing times, which in return can cause further complications. Venous disease and venous hypertension are lifelong conditions requiring lifelong management. The vicious cycle of venous reflux and obstruction associated with chronic venous disease leads to ulceration(s). Management of venous ulcers requires comprehensive wound care and compression therapy for life.