Clinician Education

Holly Hovan's picture

Holly Hovan MSN, GERO-BC, APRN, CWOCN-AP

Pain has been a prevalent health care challenge in the United States for some time, with data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showing that approximately 16% of men and 20% of women experience pain on most days or even every day.

Jeffrey M. Levine's picture

For years I was the only medical doctor doing inpatient wound consults in my hospital. I was continually amazed at the variety of wounds that reflected a wide gamut of human disease. Each wound was unique, and beyond the many pressure injuries and venous stasis lesions there were wounds from cancer, substance abuse, vasculitis, trauma, surgical dehiscence, and hematologic disorders. Most doctors viewed these as an unrewarding burden, requiring extended time unwrapping and rewrapping lesions that were malodorous, painful, and sometimes unhealable. The nurses and medical residents were puzzled at my enthusiasm and dubbed me “The Wound Man.”

WoundSource Editors's picture

Selection of a wound dressing requires a multifaceted approach. Currently, no dressing can meet all needs of a wound (infection prevention, promotion of re-epithelialization, moisture balance, etc.).1 Clinicians must weigh the benefits and drawbacks of the dressing or dressings chosen, to optimize wound healing. However, one aspect that is common to most wound dressings is the need for moisture balance to promote wound healing. To achieve this balance, an appropriate dressing must be chosen.

WoundSource Editors's picture

The digital age is upon us, like it or not, ready or not. For the past few years, payers have incentivized, encouraged, reimbursed, and adopted various digital, remote monitoring systems and devices as a way to encourage providers to adopt more digital, remote methods. Although complete telehealth services were not reimbursed in all care settings in all Zip Codes by all payers throughout the United States at the beginning of 2020, many of the restrictions and barriers to provide nearly complete digital services were suddenly released in response to the needs of a nation in the throes of a pandemic.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Patient education should be a priority to empower patients to care for themselves and improve patient outcomes. Involving patients in their own care can help them to understand about their wound and be more adherent to the overall treatment plan. Remember to involve the caregiver or family if applicable. Ask your patient questions about who will be changing the dressing so the appropriate parties can be involved.

Cheryl Carver's picture
Fairground

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, DAPWCA, FACCWS

My approach to wound care education with patients, providers, and nursing staff the last 20+ years has always been to make learning fun while emphasizing that wounds are a serious topic. My strong passion drives me to motivate anyone and everyone who wants to learn. If they don’t want to learn, then I’ll figure out the best way to motivate them! Everyone learns differently; however, hands-on training with added fun usually wins. Education should be ongoing and engaging, and it should create fun ways to experience more of those “aha” moments. We want to impact that long-term memory storage! Every care setting has variances, but my blog will provide you with some ideas that you can alter to fit your needs.

Blog Category: 
Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, DAPWCA, FACCWS

I have again been inspired by my son to blog on a not so talked about topic, scar tissue pain. I have had patients through the years report scar pain, and I admit I did not know too much about it. I decided to dive into this topic a bit more when my son started experiencing frequent pain in his chest. He had a traumatic injury to the chest 14 months ago that healed in six weeks. There is a large amount of thickened traumatic scar tissue because of the depth of the injury. The pain started approximately two months after the wound healed, and he described it as a sharp stabbing pain that would take his breath away.

Ryan Cummings's picture

By Ryan Cummings, FNP, CWS

Although the impact of depression on all aspects of health and healing is well known and has been researched in progressively greater detail over the last decade, the role depression plays in prolonging healing time in chronic wounds is still rarely addressed fully. Empirically, every wound care provider has witnessed depression in patients with chronic non-healing ulcerations, although rarely is this directly addressed in wound care training or in algorithmic treatment plans. Ongoing pain, odor, body image compromise, and lack of faith in one’s own ability to heal are only some of the issues that wound care patients are often forced to address, and we owe it to our patients to be prepared to both discuss and validate their experiences during their time in our care.

WoundSource Editors's picture

The use of wet-to-dry dressings has been the standard treatment for many wounds for decades. However, this technique is frowned on because it has various disadvantages. In this process, a saline-moistened dressing is applied to the wound bed, left to dry, and removed, generally within four to six hours.

Elizabeth Faust's picture
Keywords: 

By Elizabeth Faust, MSN, CRNP, CWS, CWOCN-AP, DAPWCA

As I reflect on 2020, and I try to think of words to describe it, connected is not a word that I would use. If nothing else, last year isolated us mentally, physically, and emotionally. I have said for years that wound care clinicians often work in silos. Some institutions have only one wound care provider. Even at the larger institutions, the depth of the work to be done may not allow for a team approach. Now there are additional infection prevention guidelines. Wound care specialists are split into teams, clinicians are trying to limit exposure, and telehealth is on the rise. Additionally, our vendor and sales representatives are unable to come in and help us in person. Even when we do get to collaborate with other clinicians or vendors, it is behind masks and goggles, six feet away, or even over the phone. The sense of connection is lost, or perhaps dwindling.

Blog Category: