Clinician Education

Robin Lenz and Fahad Hussain's picture

By Dr. Lenz and Dr. Hussain

For the patient, the prevention of sores and injuries is better than treating them. Pressure-relieving mattresses may be essential for preventing pressure injuries (bed sores). These mattresses aid in relieving and redistributing pressure and can thereby cause a reduction of friction and shearing. Pressure-relieving mattresses provide support for the body and reduce the amount of force applied to a given area. Thus, for bedbound patients and patients who are unable to reposition themselves, these types of beds can be especially beneficial.

Robin Lenz and Fahad Hussain's picture

By Dr. Lenz and Dr. Hussain

Heel pressure injuries and various forms of ulcers are easy to identify, but are you overlooking sleeping position as a cause for wounds in other locations? Do you have a wound you are sure is venous but has normal venous insufficiency testing results and fails to respond to compression? Can pressure while sleeping slow or stop healing in your patients with venous and arterial wounds? Do you ask patients about their sleeping position in your history taking and physical examination? After reading this article, you will be able to ask patients about their sleeping habits and heal more wounds with that knowledge

WoundSource Editors's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

The process of wound healing ideally progresses from inflammation to epithelialization and, finally, remodeling. If at any point bacterial (or fungal) colonization becomes prominent, the process of wound healing is disrupted. The creation of biofilm is a microbial defense mechanism that stalls the trajectory of healthy wound healing and can contribute to the development of a chronic wound. It is estimated that 90% of chronic wounds and 6% of acute wounds contain biofilms generated by microbes. Epidemiologically, chronic wounds impact 2% of the entire US population. Because of this large impact, knowledge of proper wound healing and use of clinical tools to assist the wound healing process are essential.

Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Medical device–related pressure injuries (MDRPIs) are recognized as a significant problem, evidenced by the inclusion in the National Pressure Injury Advisory Panel pressure injury definitions and described by Pitman and Gillespie in 2020.1 Prevention of medical device-related pressure injuries is a goal that may be achieved through meticulous patient care.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Chronic and nonhealing wounds are a worldwide issue and are becoming more difficult to treat. In the United States alone, according to Medicare, over 8 million Americans have chronic wounds that cost the national health care system between $18.1 and $96.8 billion per year. If standard treatment does not adequately heal a wound, additional methods of wound care treatment may be required, and the underlying disorder must be examined to determine the need for advanced wound care modalities. Advanced wound care therapies are interventions that are used after standard wound care has failed.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Patients with wounds are cared for according to the scope and standards of practice, which are used to guide nurses and other members of the interprofessional wound care team. An intricate network of physicians, medical researchers, government regulators, and medical journal contributors helps develop the standard of care. Standards are not enacted like laws; rather, they arise naturally as a result of research investigations, existing physician practices, and technological advancements. Standard of care in the health care profession is sensitive to time, place, and person. The wound care standard must be carried out in accordance with accepted wound treatment standards that are evidence based.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Wound care is complex. Even professionals who have worked as wound care specialists for decades are still learning as researchers discover more about the healing process and barriers that impede healing. Additionally, the medical professionals who may work with a patient with a complex or chronic wound can include clinicians with varying expertise, such as nurses, physical therapists, surgeons, dietitians, and so on. Fortunately, several national organizations are committed to enhancing the quality of wound care for both wound care professionals and patients alike.

WoundSource Editors's picture

By the WoundSource Editors

Moist wound healing is the current cost-effective, evidence-based modality to achieve faster wound healing rates and decreased pain and infection. As part of the wound healing process, acute wounds produce reparative exudates consisting of growth factors to support extracellular matrix production; in contrast, chronic wounds contain inflammatory-producing exudates studded with cytokines and proteases that may help maintain the inflammatory phase but can exert destructive effects on the fragile wound bed and may extend to the periwound surface.

Jeffrey M. Levine's picture

By Jeffrey M. Levine, MD, AGSF, CWSP

The malodor that emanates from some wounds has been recognized throughout human history, as starkly demonstrated in the ancient Greek play named after the principal character, Philoctetes. Written by Sophocles in the fifth century BCE, Philoctetes (pronounced fil-ok-tee’-teez) was a warrior of outstanding marksmanship who set out to win the hand of Helen of Troy, considered the most beautiful woman in the world. On the journey, his foot was bitten by a snake. The bite caused a chronic, painful wound that emitted such a foul odor that his fellow soldiers abandoned him on the deserted island of Lemnos.

WoundSource Editors's picture

By WoundSource Editors

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are open sores or wounds caused by a combination of factors that include neuropathy (lack of sensation), poor circulation, foot deformities, friction or pressure, trauma, and duration of diabetes with complication risks. DFUs occur in 34% of people with diabetes, and approximately 14% to 24 % of patients with diabetes who develop a DFU will require an amputation.