Clinician Education

WoundSource Editors's picture

The use of wet-to-dry dressings has been the standard treatment for many wounds for decades. However, this technique is frowned on because it has various disadvantages. In this process, a saline-moistened dressing is applied to the wound bed, left to dry, and removed, generally within four to six hours.

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By Elizabeth Faust, MSN, CRNP, CWS, CWOCN-AP, DAPWCA

As I reflect on 2020, and I try to think of words to describe it, connected is not a word that I would use. If nothing else, last year isolated us mentally, physically, and emotionally. I have said for years that wound care clinicians often work in silos. Some institutions have only one wound care provider. Even at the larger institutions, the depth of the work to be done may not allow for a team approach. Now there are additional infection prevention guidelines. Wound care specialists are split into teams, clinicians are trying to limit exposure, and telehealth is on the rise. Additionally, our vendor and sales representatives are unable to come in and help us in person. Even when we do get to collaborate with other clinicians or vendors, it is behind masks and goggles, six feet away, or even over the phone. The sense of connection is lost, or perhaps dwindling.

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Emily Greenstein's picture

By Emily Greenstein, APRN, CNP, CWON, FACCWS

Last month I introduced you to the concept of how being a wound care professional is often a lot like being a detective. This blog post is going to start our “cases.” I decided, in keeping with the theme, to write it up similar to what you would see in a court document.

Holly Hovan's picture
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By Holly M. Hovan, MSN, GERO-BC, APRN, CWOCN-AP

The third Thursday in November is a highly recognized day within many hospital systems and wound care programs. This day is recognized nationally as World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day, highlighted by the National Pressure Injury Advisory Panel (NPIAP). The third Thursday in November is a time to bring awareness to pressure injury prevention, treatment, and research. Each year, we highlight this day a little bit differently, but this year definitely looked much different from years past.

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Holly Hovan's picture

By: Holly M. Hovan, MSN, GERO-BC, APRN, CWOCN-AP

Every year, on the first Saturday of October, we celebrate ostomy awareness day. This is a significant day. Ostomies truly are lifesavers for so many people, and it is important that we bring awareness, education, and support to our patients, peers, and community.

This year, the United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA) is celebrated the 10th anniversary of National Ostomy Awareness Day (this event began in 2010). More information on this day and virtual events can be found here: https://www.ostomy.org/ostomy-awareness-day/

Emily Greenstein's picture

By: Emily Greenstein, APRN, CNP, CWON, FACCWS

Being a wound care professional is often a lot like being a detective. You have to decide what caused the wound, what is contributing to its not healing and how you are going to get it to heal. I have decided to start a series of “cases” that are commonly overlooked or seen in the chronic wound care setting. The cases will focus on real-life scenarios—moisture-associated skin damage versus pressure injury, red leg syndrome versus venous stasis ulcer, how to identify pyoderma, and the importance of a moist wound healing environment. This series will also provide practical strategies for overcoming healing obstacles for slow, non-healing, and challenging wounds.

WoundCon Faculty's picture
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By Michel H.E. Hermans, MD

How should I treat a patient with a partial-thickness burn on less than 10% of their body but poor vascularity?

It is not possible to give a specific answer to this question because burns larger than 10% could be anywhere from 11% to 99%. As mentioned in the presentation, larger burns cause burn disease with all its potential complications. “Poor vascularity” is a bit vague. If it is the result of diabetes, then the disease itself, including the typical microvascular problems, will contribute to poorer healing. On the other hand, peripheral arterial disease usually does not have a significant impact on the healing of partial-thickness burns unless occlusion is very severe.

Holly Hovan's picture
WOC Nursing

Holly Hovan MSN, RN-BC, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

As you may have already heard, the World Health Organization (WHO) has designated 2020 as the year of the nurse and midwife. The WHO has informed us that in order to achieve universal health coverage by 2030, we need 9 million more nurses and midwives! This is a huge number. Just think, if 9 million more nurses and midwives are needed, how many more wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC) specialists are going to be needed?

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Catherine Milne's picture
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Mentoring in Wound Care

by Catherine Milne, APRN, MSN, ANP/ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

We need mentors in wound care. Why? Our number of wound care providers cannot meet the overwhelming needs of our patients, our traditional practice patterns are changing from acute to post-acute care, reimbursement models are variable and technology is rapidly shifting. Nursing, physical therapy and medical schools are teaching less and less wound care. Many times, what is being taught is archaic.

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Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

Article Title: Graduating Student Nurses' and Student Podiatrists' Wound Care Competence: A Cross-Sectional Study
Authors: Kielo E, Salminen L, Suhonen R, Puukka P, Stolt M
Journal: J Wound Care. 2019;28(3):136-145
Reviewed by: Stephanie Golding, class of 2020, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

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