Clinician Education

Thomas Serena's picture
medical identity

by Thomas E. Serena, MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

"This is my brother Darryl and this is my other brother Darryl."
—Bob Newhart show

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Thomas Serena's picture
The Importance of Clinical Trials

By Thomas E. Serena MD, FACS, FACHM, FAPWCA

Editor's note:This blog post is part of the WoundSource Trending Topics series, bringing you insight into the latest clinical issues and advancement in wound management, with contributions by the WoundSource Editorial Advisory Board.

Paula Erwin-Toth's picture
Professional Development

by Paula Erwin-Toth MSN, RN, CWOCN, CNS, FAAN

Tradition claims March comes in like a lion and leaves like a lamb. Depending on where you live, March is in a full-throated roar! Kids are thinking about spring break, and the spring holidays are just around the corner, as is the dreaded annual spring cleaning ritual. Most of us are striving to achieve a work-life balance. Part of that endeavor requires us to take time for ourselves to ensure we meet our professional goals.

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Fabiola Jimenez's picture
nursing career

By Fabiola Jimenez, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

Nursing has given me great opportunities; some of them I never imagined possible. I started as a medical surgical nurse in an oncology unit where the treatment of the day was gauze soaked in Dakin's solution for the management of post op radical neck surgery. I moved on to intensive care, travel nursing, Army nursing, and endoscopy. It was in endoscopy and working with the colorectal surgeons, who helped me get my clinical experience while pursuing a master's degree in nursing, where I found out that it all could be tied together with a certification in wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC), and a wound care nurse is born!

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Holly Hovan's picture
staff education in wound care

By Holly Hovan MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CWON-AP

As I am sure we are all well aware, not everyone loves wounds, ostomies, and continence as much as we do. Some nurses just do not have the passion (or desire) to perform wound care and learn about different modalities. On the other hand, some nurses are so eager to learn, obtain certification, and be the unit-based experts! In my experience, taking a hands-on approach to wound care education has been the most successful in terms of teaching wound assessment and dressing changes/techniques.

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Cheryl Carver's picture
long-term care wound education

By Cheryl Carver LPN, WCC, CWCA, CWCP, FACCWS, DAPWCA, CLTC

I tell everyone that long-term care is the toughest arena for a wound consultant. However, it can also be the most rewarding. The focus of this month's blog is to give you an inside look of what really goes on in nursing homes versus other health care settings.

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Terri Kolenich's picture
the-continuum-of-wound-care

By Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

Have you ever confronted yourself with thoughts of how your role plays into the grand scheme of wound care? I am sure any wound nurse or physician would quickly answer "of course!" – since the role of a direct caregiver is so blaringly obvious.

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Lindsay Andronaco's picture
patient centered care

By Lindsay Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

Medicine changes constantly, and we must stay up to date on the best options for our patients. You're reading this because you want to be a better caretaker for the sick and injured - you want to be a better provider.

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Margaret Heale's picture
wound care terminology

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Looking back on a previous New England WOCN Society regional conference I attended, it strikes me that there where several impressive items discussed relating to the topic of pressure injuries.

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Terri Kolenich's picture
self-care for nurses

By Terri Kolenich, RN, CWCA, AAPWCA

We have all heard time and time again how important it is to take care of yourself first so you can take better care of others. It is impossible to give something you do not have. Nurses, by nature and training, care for others before caring for themselves. Taking care of yourself should be as important to you as caring for your patients. This life lesson is clearly presented by flight attendants before every take off. Let me explain.

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