Palliative Wound Care

Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine's picture
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine Journal Review Club

Article Title: Pressure Injury Progression and Factors Associated With Different End-Points in a Home Palliative Care Setting: A Retrospective Chart Review Study
Authors: Artico M, D’Angelo D, Piredda M, et al
Journal: J Pain Symptom Manage 2018;56(1):23-31
Reviewed by: Arden Harada, class of 2021, Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine

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WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture
Palliative Care

by the WoundSource Editors

Pressure Injury/Ulcer Risk Management in Palliative Care and Hospice

Palliative care and hospice care are not the same, but they both share one goal. They both focus on a patient's physical, mental, social, and spiritual needs. Palliative care can begin at diagnosis and treatment or for patients at any stage of their illness. Patients may not want to receive aggressive treatment of non-healing wounds because of underlying diseases, pain, and/or cost.1

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
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doctor giving patient hope

By Aletha Tippett MD

I have written about so many things over the past years… Maybe now is a good time to announce that I am writing a book called Hear Our Cry, an autobiographical story about 20 years of wound care and limb salvage. The process has had quite an impact on me, reviewing all the pictures and notes from my wound patients from the past two decades.

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture
patient centered care

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Recently there have been numerous articles and webinars focusing on the methods health care professional can employ to effectively communicate and engage in end of life conversations with patients receiving palliative and/or hospice care.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
Aletha Tippett demonstrating Maggot Therapy

By Aletha Tippett MD

There is lots in store for the new year, and a great many wound care conferences just chock-full of information. There is one conference this year that you may not know about—small, quiet, highly informative and productive. That is the 2015 Palliative Wound Care Conference that will be held in Orlando, Florida, in May this year.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
grief

By Aletha Tippett MD

The topic of grief and bereavement is near to my heart right now as I just lost my beloved therapy dog, Barney, suddenly to hemangiosarcoma after years of service. He was an important and valued part of our healing community and will be mourned for a long time.

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Diana Gallagher's picture
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By Diana L. Gallagher MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

While watching the CBS news show, Sunday Morning, my attention was captured by a piece offered by Steve Hartman. I admit that I am a fan of Steve Hartman. I always enjoy his sense of which stories are really important. Today's news is filled with turmoil, tragedy, and drama; a lot like life but on a much larger scale. There simply has to be something positive trapped in the midst of so much overwhelming negative information. Once again, Steve Hartman found that thread of optimism in the midst of tragedy. It is that invisible thread and hope that there is something positive to reap out of overwhelming tragedy that serves as a lifeline to so many of us.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

By Aletha Tippett MD

I recently had a patient encounter that reminded me of the difference between palliative and curative wound care. In my role as a hospice medical director with a specialty in wound care, I am often asked to see wounds in our hospice patients. I was asked to see this particular patient because of a wound on her coccyx. I had already approved the nurse’s order of medicated hydrogel covered with a foam dressing, changed every three days. This seemed like a reasonable treatment plan; simple and straightforward. I also gave instructions to provide adequate support surface on her mattress, static air if possible.

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Lindsay Andronaco's picture

By Lindsay D. Andronaco RN, BSN, CWCN, WOC, DAPWCA, FAACWS

In the past two blogs I have discussed a controversial topic, skin failure. We all have strong feelings on this topic and have experienced different cases in our practice. Dispute the controversial feelings on KTUs and skin failure; I would like to now just address the viewpoint of the family and how to approach these difficult conversations.

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