Risk Assessment and Prevention

Robin Lenz and Fahad Hussain's picture

By Dr. Lenz and Dr. Hussain

For the patient, the prevention of sores and injuries is better than treating them. Pressure-relieving mattresses may be essential for preventing pressure injuries (bed sores). These mattresses aid in relieving and redistributing pressure and can thereby cause a reduction of friction and shearing. Pressure-relieving mattresses provide support for the body and reduce the amount of force applied to a given area. Thus, for bedbound patients and patients who are unable to reposition themselves, these types of beds can be especially beneficial.

Robin Lenz and Fahad Hussain's picture

By Dr. Lenz and Dr. Hussain

Heel pressure injuries and various forms of ulcers are easy to identify, but are you overlooking sleeping position as a cause for wounds in other locations? Do you have a wound you are sure is venous but has normal venous insufficiency testing results and fails to respond to compression? Can pressure while sleeping slow or stop healing in your patients with venous and arterial wounds? Do you ask patients about their sleeping position in your history taking and physical examination? After reading this article, you will be able to ask patients about their sleeping habits and heal more wounds with that knowledge

Holly Hovan's picture

By Holly Hovan, MSN, GERO-BC, APRN, CWOCN-AP

Moisture-associated skin damage (MASD) is becoming increasingly prevalent in today’s health care system. Often associated with discomfort and pain, MASD ultimately negatively impacts quality of life. MASD is usually broken down into 3 or 4 categories, most commonly incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD), intertriginous dermatitis, periwound dermatitis, and peristomal dermatitis. In this blog, I focus on the prevention and treatment of IAD and subsequent pressure injuries in critical care through a nurse-led approach.

Margaret Heale's picture

By Margaret Heale, RN, MSc, CWOCN

Medical device–related pressure injuries (MDRPIs) are recognized as a significant problem, evidenced by the inclusion in the National Pressure Injury Advisory Panel pressure injury definitions and described by Pitman and Gillespie in 2020.1 Prevention of medical device-related pressure injuries is a goal that may be achieved through meticulous patient care.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

Wound documentation is critical for the delivery of effective wound care, the facilitation of care continuity, and proper health data coding. Inaccurate wound documentation can impact the ability to determine the best wound treatment options and the overall wound healing process. Unfortunately, almost half of all medical record notes on wounds lack key details on assessment and intervention in some settings.

WoundSource Editors's picture

By WoundSource Editors

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are open sores or wounds caused by a combination of factors that include neuropathy (lack of sensation), poor circulation, foot deformities, friction or pressure, trauma, and duration of diabetes with complication risks. DFUs occur in 34% of people with diabetes, and approximately 14% to 24 % of patients with diabetes who develop a DFU will require an amputation.

Cheryl Carver's picture

By Cheryl Carver, LPN, WCC, CWCA, DAPWCA, FACCWS

May is Mental Health Awareness Month and with the staggering statistics of one in four adults living with mental illness, I immediately was motivated to write a personal blog. I previously shared my son’s experience here in 2020, in “Wound Management Challenges in Prison Populations,” and discussed the importance of establishing a quality of wound care. I started thinking about the high number of incarcerated people with mental health issues, and it prompted me to conduct a bit more research. Given my son's dual diagnosis of schizophrenia and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), I recall having a conversation with him during this time about debridement methods because advanced wound care would become extremely complicated. I immediately started educating him on possible dressings and debridement methods that could be used on his wound. This gave him an idea of what to expect and allowed him to decline certain treatments if he so preferred.

Liping Tang's picture

By Liping Tang, PhD

Infection is the single most likely cause of delayed healing in chronic wounds. In most cases, identification of chronic wound infection (e.g., diabetic foot ulcers and venous leg ulcers) is not obvious because chronic wounds do not exhibit the same classic inflammatory signs of infection as those found in acute wounds. More arduously, those common signs of infection—pain, erythema, heat, and purulent exudate— vary as we age and occur differently in those with underlying diseases or weakened immune systems. Diagnosis is generally based on the doctors’ experience and could be confirmed with microbiological culture of tissue biopsy. However, culture could take a few days, and the results may not always be reliable because of sampling error. A fast and accurate diagnosis of wound infection would relieve the patient of significant discomfort and improve the treatment outcome.

WoundSource Practice Accelerator's picture

The COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted many aspects of patient care and medical practice. Changes have ranged from supply chain adjustments to transformations in patient interactions. Many of these practices may be standard for the foreseeable future. Although many medical professionals have attended to patients with COVID-19, there has been a major decrease in other necessary aspects of medical care, including wound management.

Emily Greenstein's picture

By Emily Greenstein, APRN, CNP, CWON, FACCWS

After attending the Spring Symposium for Advanced Wound Care and hearing many great lectures, I got to thinking, “What are the pillars of chronic wound care?” We have all heard of the concept “look at the whole patient and not the hole in the patient.” Heck, I have even written about it. But we also need to have a good foundation for how to implement this phrase or where to even start. I did a quick Internet search and came up with some interesting articles that talked about the basics of wound care and management. I found discussions on everything from maintaining a moist wound environment to being financially responsible. All of this information leads me to the concept of developing easy-to-understand pillars or categories to consider when caring for a patient with a chronic wound.