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Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

During our training, we are all taught about the three phases of normal wound healing: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. This is a relatively well-understood area of wound management, and one that is predictable and consistent. Sadly, in wound management as in life, nothing is ever quite that simple. A number of wounds appear to deviate from this well-organized process, and go on to present major healing difficulties.

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Michael Miller's picture

By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 6

“IMPOSSIBLE, for a plain yellow pumpkin to become a golden carriage… But the world is full of zanies and fools, who don’t believe in sensible rules, and who won’t believe what sensible people say. And because these daft and dewy-eyed dopes keep building up impossible hopes, impossible, things are happening every day” (Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella).

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Glenda Motta's picture

By Glenda Motta RN, MPH

In 1978, I was hired to develop a comprehensive discharge planning program at an inner city hospital in Washington, D.C. Way before DRGs and any reimbursement limits were placed on hospitals, this facility knew it had a problem. 40 patients had a length of stay that exceeded 60 days! Can you imagine that scenario today?

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Karen Zulkowski's picture
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By Karen Zulkowski DNS, RN, CWS

How do you act when giving a deposition? It’s not something we covered in school. As I said last month, you probably won’t remember the plaintiff (patient). You may have only taken care of the person once or twice or when they were your patient. They may have gone back and forth to ICU and different units, or between the hospital and nursing home, so you had limited contact with them.

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Kathi Thimsen's picture

By Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

In follow up to comments and additional considerations of products, ingredients, and clinical practice, it is important to discuss several aspects of the topic. This blog has served thus far as a primer for the evolution of products both on the market today and currently under development.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture
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By Aletha Tippett MD

I am often asked this common question: “how do you select the right mattress or support surface for a patient?” Despite the plethora of information on how to do this, I am going to give a very simple answer: lay on it yourself. It amazes me how few caregivers have ever lain on a bed that they prescribe for a patient. It always shocks me to visit a nursing home patient and sit beside them on their bed. The bed is hard as a rock. When I ask if their bed is comfortable, the answer is a resounding NO. I always think: would YOU want to lay on this bed, would you want YOUR GRANDMOTHER (or GRANDFATHER) to lay on this bed?

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Mary Ellen Posthauer's picture

By Mary Ellen Posthauer RDN, CD, LD, FAND

Previously, I discussed the value of protein for wound healing. Protein is responsible for cell multiplication, repair, and synthesis of enzymes involved in wound healing. Protein supplies the binding material of skin, cartilage, and muscle. The 2009 National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel/European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP/EPUAP) guidelines recommend 1.2-1.5 grams of protein/kilogram of body weight for individuals with pressure ulcers, when compatible with goals of care.

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Ron Sherman's picture

By Ron Sherman MD, MSC, DTM&H

As far back as 1930, clinicians and researchers had a pretty good understanding of what “the right kind of maggots” could do for a wound. Those maggots are now known generically as “medicinal maggots” or “medical grade maggots.” Largely as the result of careful observations by William Baer (Chief, Orthopedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore) and others, we now describe the beneficial effects of medicinal maggots as being: 1) debridement; 2) disinfection; and 3) growth promotion. What is the evidence for these effects, and why is it that the only brand of medicinal maggots cleared by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for marketing in the US (Medical Maggots™ by Monarch Labs, Irvine, CA) lists only debridement among its indications?

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Laurie Swezey's picture

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Ultrasound was successfully used as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for years before its potential benefits in wound healing were first investigated. Ultrasound waves, formed when electrical energy is converted to sound waves at frequencies above the range of human hearing, are now routinely used in wound management, and can be transferred to tissue through a treatment applicator. The depth of penetration is dependent on the frequency, with higher frequencies resulting in lower tissue penetration.

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Michael Miller's picture
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By Michael Miller DO, FACOS, FAPWCA

RAMBLINGS OF AN ITINERANT WOUND CARE GUY PT. 5

“Then if you got it, you don’t want it - seems to be the rule of thumb. Don’t be tricked by what you see, you got two ways to go.” Devo – Freedom of Choice