Acute Wounds

Kathy Gallagher's picture
Acute Surgical Wound Service

By Kathy Gallagher, DNP, APRN-FNP, CMC, UMC, BC, WCC, CWS, FACCWS

In 2010, Christiana Care Health System, a 1,000 bed Level I trauma center in Wilmington, Delaware, introduced an acute surgical wound service (ASWS) integration plan in with a single dedicated nurse practitioner, trauma surgeon, and administrative leader. Subsequently, trauma patients with complex wounds experienced decreased morbidity and length of stay. Closely aligned with these numbers, their patient days of negative pressure wound therapy fell from 11+ days in 2010 to 8.2 days in 2018, representing one of the lowest in the nation.

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Kathy Gallagher's picture
Acute Wounds

By Kathy Gallagher, DNP, APRN-FNP, CMC, UMC, BC, WCC, CWS, FACCWS

Welcome to the first in a series of blogs focusing on acute surgical wound management. Future segments will discuss steps toward developing an acute surgical wound service (ASWS) and tips reflective of successful healing strategies.

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Burn Treatment

by the WoundSource Editors

Burn management is typically based on the severity of the wound, and the goals are to prevent shock, relieve pain and discomfort, and reduce the risk of infection. Pathogens are present everywhere, and any breach in the skin, especially burns, can lead to infection. When burns cover up to 35% in adults and 30% in children, they are considered major burns, and anything above those levels is considered critical or life-threatening. A thorough assessment of the patient and burn site is necessary to determine the most appropriate treatment interventions given the type and severity of the burn injury.

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Industry News's picture

By Industry News

Pennington, NJ – March, 7 2018 – Dermalink Technologies Inc. (Dermalink) is pleased to announce the development of the first of its novel biofilm-disrupting products for the U.S. wound care market. The core ingredient, Lauroyl Arginine Ethylester (LAE), has been available in Europe for several years, where it has rapidly established itself as a proven anti-biofilm agent in the food and dental markets.

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Laurie Swezey's picture
phases of wound healing

By Laurie Swezey RN, BSN, CWOCN, CWS, FACCWS

Do you understand the difference between acute and chronic wounds? If you answered that acute wounds are wounds that have been present for a shorter duration of time, you are correct--but there are many other differences in acute and chronic wounds that are not as obvious and must be taken into account when planning care.

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By the WoundSource Editors

Generally speaking, a burn is an injury to the tissue of the body, typically the skin. Burns can vary in severity from mild to life-threatening. Most burns only affect the uppermost layers of skin, but depending on the depth of the burn, underlying tissues can also be affected. Traditionally, burns are characterized by degree, with first being least severe and third being most. However, a more precise classification system referring to the thickness or depth of the wound is now more commonly used. For the sake of this article, burns will be described by thickness. For a comparison of the two classification systems, see the table below.

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